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Everything You Need to Know About Fences & Gates

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Everything You Need to Know About Fences & Gates

July 19, 2017

Curb appeal starts at your fence or gate. It’s the first thing visitors see—and also one of the first big investments you may make when you buy a house. The average cost of installing a new fence is $2,388, according to HomeAdvisor.

Use our brand-new field guide, Fences & Gates 101, to learn everything you need to know about the best styles to complement the architecture of your house. Maybe you’re installing a new fence (for privacy, to keep out deer, or to mask unsightly physical elements adjacent to your property). Or maybe you’re merely upgrading the hardware on an existing gate (latches and hinges). Either way, we’ve got tips to help you choose the best materials, height, and durability.

Fences & Gates 101 is part of our new Garden Design 101 section, offering design tips and practical advice on such hardscape topics as Decks & Patios, Exterior Hardware, Gravel & Decomposed Granite, Outdoor Lighting, Retaining Walls, and Pavers.

Here’s a glimpse of what you’ll find in our Fences & Gates 101 guide:

Hog Wire Fences

A mainstay on ranches for decades, hog wire panels been discovered by homeowners and landscape designers as an affordable, low-profile solution for maintaining a wide-open view while keeping animals out. They even possess a certain elegance. Photograph by Nicole Franzen for Gardenista.
Above: A mainstay on ranches for decades, hog wire panels been discovered by homeowners and landscape designers as an affordable, low-profile solution for maintaining a wide-open view while keeping animals out. They even possess a certain elegance. Photograph by Nicole Franzen for Gardenista.

See more at Hardscaping 101: Hog Wire Fences.

Instant Rollout Fences

Made of natural materials such as bamboo, willow, reed, or wood, instant rollout fences are easy to install (just unfurl and attach to posts). Photograph via Manufactum.
Above: Made of natural materials such as bamboo, willow, reed, or wood, instant rollout fences are easy to install (just unfurl and attach to posts). Photograph via Manufactum.
See more at Trend Alert: Instant Rollout Fences.

Woven Fences

Woven fencing can largely be divided into two types—hurdles which are moveable panels that can be slotted into the ground and then bound to other hurdles with posts, or continuous woven fencing, which, as the name suggests, is installed onsite to any dimensions. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.
Above: Woven fencing can largely be divided into two types—hurdles which are moveable panels that can be slotted into the ground and then bound to other hurdles with posts, or continuous woven fencing, which, as the name suggests, is installed onsite to any dimensions. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

See more at Hardscaping 101: Woven Fences.

Dry Stone Walls

Dry stone walls have been created for thousands of years and, if done well, will look as if they have been in place for at least that long. Photograph by Britt Willoughby Dyer.
Above: Dry stone walls have been created for thousands of years and, if done well, will look as if they have been in place for at least that long. Photograph by Britt Willoughby Dyer.

For more, see Hardscaping 101: Dry Stone Walls.

Japanese-Style Fences

Above: The calming simplicity of a Japanese-style fence, with its emphasis on natural materials and minimal distractions, creates a serene backdrop of bamboo, wicker, or wood. Photograph via Bamboo.
See more at 10 Easy Pieces: Japanese-Style Fences and Screens.

Picket Fences

A picket fence built of \2-by-\2-inch pieces of clear cedar and a standing-seam metal roof are a nod to classic farmhouse style. Photograph by Matthew Williams. See more of this project at Garden Visit: At Home with Architect Kelly Haegglund in Mill Valley, California.
Above: A picket fence built of 2-by-2-inch pieces of clear cedar and a standing-seam metal roof are a nod to classic farmhouse style. Photograph by Matthew Williams. See more of this project at Garden Visit: At Home with Architect Kelly Haegglund in Mill Valley, California.

See more at Hardscaping 101: Picket Fences.

Gabion Walls

Used for thousands of years by military and structural engineers, gabions provide an attractive, effective, and inexpensive fence or retaining-wall system. Photograph by Karolina Bak, courtesy of Loft Kolasińki.
Above: Used for thousands of years by military and structural engineers, gabions provide an attractive, effective, and inexpensive fence or retaining-wall system. Photograph by Karolina Bak, courtesy of Loft Kolasińki.

For more, see Hardscaping 101: Gabion Walls.

Privacy Fences

In a Pacific Palisades, California landscape, Grow Outdoor Design used a combination of sliding wood gate, Cor-ten steel panel, and jasmine-covered hog-wire fencing, which “all harmonize to create privacy,” according to firm partner Joel Lichtenwalter.
Above: In a Pacific Palisades, California landscape, Grow Outdoor Design used a combination of sliding wood gate, Cor-ten steel panel, and jasmine-covered hog-wire fencing, which “all harmonize to create privacy,” according to firm partner Joel Lichtenwalter.

See more at Architects’ Secrets: 10 Ideas to Create Privacy in the Garden.

N.B.: Our curated Fences & Gates 101 guide also covers Gate Latches, Black Fences, and Horizontal Slat Fences.

Finally, learn how to successfully design a fence for any landscape or garden project with our Hardscaping 101: Fences & Gates guide.

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