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Gravel

Hardscaping 101: Gravel

Nothing sounds better than the crunch of gravel underfoot.

One of the most versatile hardscape materials, gravel comes in as many colors and varieties as there are types of stone. (Gravel’s cousin, decomposed granite, is an even finer grade of crushed rock.) Budget-conscious alternatives to big slabs of stone, gravel and decomposed granite (nickname: DG) are good choices to pave paths, to fill gaps between pavers, and to carpet courtyards. (Skip to the advice posts.)

The natural stone colors of gravel and decomposed granite will complement a landscape and contrast with nearby foliage to make plants look more richly green and textured. For inspiration, look at our design guides on Gravel 101 and Decomposed Granite 101.  (And we’ve rounded up more design ideas in Gravel Gardens 101.)

Gravel: Essential Reading

Gravel: Inspiration & Resources

Design Ideas for Gravel

All Posts About Gravel

Accessories & Tools for a Gravel Garden