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5 Favorites: The Best Plants for a Bath Bouquet

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5 Favorites: The Best Plants for a Bath Bouquet

January 18, 2022

Incorporating plants into your bathroom, of course, isn’t new. (See 7 Favorites: Houseplants for the Bath.) We know that adding plants to this room can improve air quality and mood, absorb extra moisture, and add visual interest. They can also act as natural aromatherapy. Hanging certain aromatic plant cuttings can turn your bathroom into a fancy spa experience.

Please keep reading to learn more about adding bath bouquets to your bathroom:

Featured photograph courtesy of Floral Society, from Design Sleuth: Instant Spa Bathroom.

What is a bath bouquet?

Photograph by Aya Brackett, from Flower Delivery: Lavender Bundles for Valentine’s Day.
Above: Photograph by Aya Brackett, from Flower Delivery: Lavender Bundles for Valentine’s Day.

A bath bouquet is basically cuttings of fragrant plants tied together with natural twine and hung from a shower head or bath spigot. When I made one, I laid out stems of fresh eucalyptus and rosemary on a cutting board and rolled over them with a rolling pin to gently crush the leaves and awaken the oils, then tied them together with twine. Once my bundle was hung, I turned on the water and let the invigorating scent fill the room while I took a shower.

When you make your own bath bouquet, be sure all your cuttings are free from chemicals and pesticides. And even better than buying sprigs at the flower store, consider growing your own favorites to always have on hand for yourself or to give as thoughtful gifts. You can also experiment with different fragrance combinations to find your favorites.

What are the health benefits?

Above: Photographs by Parker Fitzgerald, from 5 Beautiful Ways to Make Fresh Herbs Last Longer.

Not only do these plants smell and look lovely, they can be beneficial to your body and mind. The steam and heat activate and release the essential oils in the plants, which stimulate the smell receptors in your nose, which then sends messages through your nervous system to the part of your brain that controls emotions. This rendition of aromatherapy can help relieve congestion, ease sore throats, boost circulation, help de-stress, and relax the whole body. (Note: if you are pregnant, please consult your doctor first.)

Top 5 plants to hang

Photograph by Aya Brackett, from Flower Delivery: Lavender Bundles for Valentine’s Day.
Above: Photograph by Aya Brackett, from Flower Delivery: Lavender Bundles for Valentine’s Day.
  • Eucalyptus: Spicy oils from this plant help relieve nose and chest congestion and inhaling air infused with this oil can help lower your blood pressure.
  • Rosemary: This aromatic plant helps reduce fatigue and boosts mental activity and enhance concentration. In folk medicine, rosemary has long been associated with improving memory.
  • Lavender: One of the most popular fragrant plants, lavender’s aroma and oil are known for aiding in sleep and relaxation. Hang a calming bunch for your nighttime bath or shower and forget about counting sheep later.
  • Lemongrass: Use long stems of this fresh citrus smelling plant to bring a sense of calm to the mind and body. In aromatherapy, lemongrass is commonly used to help relieve anxiety, stress and depression.
  • Mint: Either peppermint or spearmint can refresh and energize while at the same time reduce tension and stress. In general, inhaling menthol soothes an irritated throat and creates a cooling effect. Try hanging mint in the morning shower or bath to invigorate your senses and start your day strong.

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