Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Landscape Ideas: 8 Favorite Gardens by Dutch Designer Piet Oudolf

Search

Landscape Ideas: 8 Favorite Gardens by Dutch Designer Piet Oudolf

April 30, 2017

One way to get a glimpse of Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf’s romantic view of ruin? Join the Disney-size crowds who are shuffling along the elevated length of Manhattan’s High Line Park, where tall sweeps of grasses and wildflowers poke up theatrically through an abandoned elevated railway. Another way to become with Oudolf’s perennial plantings and wildflower meads is to visit some of his other projects.

Here are eight Piet Oudolf gardens with ideas worth stealing:

Hamm, Germany: Maximilianpark

In Hamm, Germany, Maximilianpark was formerly a coal mine, now transformed into gardens, play spaces, and a sanctuary for pollinators. Oudolf designed this sweep of wildflower meadow. Photograph by Esther Westerveld via Flickr.
Above: In Hamm, Germany, Maximilianpark was formerly a coal mine, now transformed into gardens, play spaces, and a sanctuary for pollinators. Oudolf designed this sweep of wildflower meadow. Photograph by Esther Westerveld via Flickr.

Enköping, Sweden: Drömparken

Designed in 96 by Oudolf, Drömparken (or Dream Park) in Sweden earned its name because it &#8
Above: Designed in 1996 by Oudolf, Drömparken (or Dream Park) in Sweden earned its name because it “contains Oudolf’s favorite plants, his dream seedlings.” Photograph by Esther Westerveld via Flickr.

Yorkshire, England: Scampston Hall

&#8
Above: “The sheer scale of the place is difficult to grapple with. The kitchen garden alone at Scampston Hall, in Yorkshire, in the north of England, contains four acres within its brick walls. But in the end, the impossible size has been the making of this garden and its staggering renewal,” writes Kendra Wilson. Photograph by Alexandre Bailhache.

For more, see Garden Visit: Dutch Master Piet Oudolf in Yorkshire.

Hummelo, Netherlands: Oudolf’s Home

Deschampsia cespitosa in Oudolf&#8
Above: Deschampsia cespitosa in Oudolf’s own garden in the Netherlands. Photograph courtesy of My Garden School. For more see Garden Design: Learning to Plant the Piet Oudolf Way.

When you enroll at My Garden School, an online school where you can take courses with all manner of experts. Planting The Piet Oudolf Way, a four-week course with Oudolf and his long-time collaborator Dr Noel Kingsbury, costs £250 and is one of 30 horticultural programs on offer.

Somerset, England: Hauser & Wirth

&#8
Above: “Hauser & Wirth is a place that people cross the country, and the world, to see,” writes Kendra.
“The main draw for garden visitors is Oudolf Field, a slope of 1.5 acres enclosed on three sides by traditional hedging. It’s a former field that is now a garden, conceived by international star Piet Oudolf.”

Fore more, see Designer Visit: Piet Oudolf’s Otherworldly Garden at Hauser & Wirth.

Chicago, Illinois: Lurie Garden

Photograph by Esther Westerveld via Flickr.
Above: Photograph by Esther Westerveld via Flickr.

In Chicago’s Millenium Park, there are 222 types of plants in the 2.5-acre Lurie Garden, designed by Oudolf to offer “a four-season experience blending Chicago’s past, present and future with bold design, dramatic form and intimate spaces. Its design pays homage to Chicago’s transformation from flat marshland to innovative green city, or ‘Urbs in Horto’ (City in a Garden).” For more information, see Lurie Garden.

Stoke-on-Trent, England: Trentham Estate

In long borders he designed to flank a pathway at The Trentham Estate in England, Oudolf punctuated the landscape with several clumps of identical grasses. “Repeating plants at regular intervals adds rhythm and variation,” says Oudolf. “It creates a feeling that ‘this is one place, with one design and one vision.“ Photograph via Hummelo courtesy of The Monacelli Press.
Above: In long borders he designed to flank a pathway at The Trentham Estate in England, Oudolf punctuated the landscape with several clumps of identical grasses. “Repeating plants at regular intervals adds rhythm and variation,” says Oudolf. “It creates a feeling that ‘this is one place, with one design and one vision.“ Photograph via Hummelo courtesy of The Monacelli Press.

London, England: Serpentine Gallery

Photograph by Chuck B. via Flickr.
Above: Photograph by Chuck B. via Flickr.

“Every summer, the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens unveils a new pavilion built by a renowned architect, designed to stand for just three months.,” notes the Telegraph. In 2011, Oudolf designed the garden. For more photos, see Telegraph.

We recently reviewed Mr. Oudolf’s book, Planting: A New Perspective.

For more on Piet Oudolf, see:

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0