Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Landscape Design: 10 Tips for a Fire-Safe Garden

Search

Landscape Design: 10 Tips for a Fire-Safe Garden

August 15, 2023

The wildfires that have ravaged parts of this country are making us all more aware of this real or potential threat. You’re at higher risk if you live close to wildlands, or in an area with low rainfall where dry vegetation can spread flames in an instant.

What can you do to keep your family, property, and home safe from fire damage? The type of plants in your garden, the design of your landscape, and how you maintain it can all make a big difference. For solutions, we consulted with Michele Steinberg, Wildfire Division Manager at the National Fire Protection Association.  According to Steinberg, “There are easy techniques people can use with their landscaping and gardens to resist fire and protect their homes.”

Here are 10 tips for designing a fire-smart landscape:

1. Prune trees so the branches don’t touch or overhang the house.

In an open-air walled courtyard in Los Angeles, awell-pruned ficus trees are under-planted with mother ferns, liriope, and spiky red-leafed cordyline. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.
Above: In an open-air walled courtyard in Los Angeles, awell-pruned ficus trees are under-planted with mother ferns, liriope, and spiky red-leafed cordyline. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

“Even if you have a good roof and siding, you could have an issue if you’ve got a lot of flammable vegetation up against the house,” says Steinberg. Ideally, trees should be placed at least 10 feet away from structures, and you should remove “ladder fuels” by pruning the branches up at least six feet to reduce the chance of the trees catching fire from flames traveling along the ground.

2. Plant shrubs well away from the house.

At Gardenista editor Michelle Slatalla&#8\2\17;s house in northern California, a bluestone patio abuts the house; shrubs are banished to the perimeter of the garden. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista. See more of this garden in our book, Gardenista: The Definitive Guide to Stylish Outdoor Spaces.
Above: At Gardenista editor Michelle Slatalla’s house in northern California, a bluestone patio abuts the house; shrubs are banished to the perimeter of the garden. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista. See more of this garden in our book, Gardenista: The Definitive Guide to Stylish Outdoor Spaces.

You don’t want branches touching the façade. “The area out to about five feet is a critical zone,” Michele says. “You could have some low-growing plants there, especially if they’re ones that have a lot of moisture.”

3. Dispose of debris.

Ginkgo leaves. For more, see The Talk of the Town: A Restrained Landscape for a Modernist Estate in Hastings-on-Hudson.
Above: Ginkgo leaves. For more, see The Talk of the Town: A Restrained Landscape for a Modernist Estate in Hastings-on-Hudson.

Clear away any leaves and branches left by pruning, and rake up and dispose of leaves and other debris that has accumulated near your house, especially within 10 feet. Don’t let dry grass, leaves, pine needles, and other debris collect under your deck or porch.

Of course, it’s also wise to keep the rain gutters on your house free of combustible debris, as well as any flat surfaces such as roofs, porches, and carports.

4. Choose fire-resistant plants.

Succulents are fire-resistant, with water-filled leaves in a garden designed by Judy Kameon of Elysian Landscapes. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.
Above: Succulents are fire-resistant, with water-filled leaves in a garden designed by Judy Kameon of Elysian Landscapes. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

Plants are less likely to ignite if they have moist, supple leaves and a low amount of sap, resin, oil, or wax. “Because plants vary so much around the country, we don’t list which ones are more or less flammable,” says Steinberg. Instead, the NFPA recommends that homeowners ask the nearest Co-op Extension (an educational service offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) for lists of fire-wise plants in their region.

“Or you can research it by Googling ‘fire-wise plants’ or ‘fire-wise landscaping’,” Steinberg adds.

5. Keep your lawn mowed and well irrigated.

Above: For more of this project, see the 2017 Gardenista Considered Design Awards.

“Grass that’s kept watered and mowed is much less likely to catch fire from embers or small flames running along the surface of the ground, burning whatever they can burn,” Steinberg says.

6. Keep your plants healthy.

A drip-irrigation system keeps plants well-watered in Sonoma, California. For more of this garden, see Before & After: An Artful Gravel Garden in Sonoma, California. Photograph by Mimi Giboin for Gardenista.
Above: A drip-irrigation system keeps plants well-watered in Sonoma, California. For more of this garden, see Before & After: An Artful Gravel Garden in Sonoma, California. Photograph by Mimi Giboin for Gardenista.

“Plants in good condition won’t present nearly as much risk as dead or dying plants that are throwing off a lot of leaves or debris,” says Steinberg. “Maintain a regular irrigation schedule and so shrubs don’t get overgrown or dry—keep them well pruned without dead leaves and branches.” If water use is restricted in your area, consider xeriscaping.

7. Avoid flammable mulches.

Above: Decomposed granite and other gravel mulches are not flammable. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

“Parts of the country use pine needles for mulch, and while these don’t carry fire for very long, they do burn well and have caused a lot of problems,” says Steinberg. “Even bark mulch will ignite, so it can be a big hazard when it’s piled up against a house’s wood shingles or under a deck.” Instead of organic materials, use gravel, pebbles, or rock for mulching, especially in that vulnerable area up against the house.

8. Replace wooden decks, fences, and boardwalks with nonflammable materials.

Consider putting in a stone or concrete patio instead of a deck, and perhaps metal fencing in place of wood.

Concrete is a non-flammable material to use on a patio or terrace. Photograph by Mimi Giboin.
Above: Concrete is a non-flammable material to use on a patio or terrace. Photograph by Mimi Giboin.

“Hardscaping is a good way to break up the continuity of vegetative fuels, such as grasses, plants, and shrubs,” says Steinberg. “Think about little flames creeping across the grass: when they hit a cement walkway they’re going to stop, as there’s nothing left to burn.” Fire-resistant materials are also a good choice for patio furniture, swing sets, and the like.

9. Be careful with your fire pit.

LA-based designer Judy Kameon of Elysian Landscapes created a fire-safe decomposed granite pad to surround a fire pit, creating a patio seating area in a Studio City garden. Photograph by Laure Joliet.
Above: LA-based designer Judy Kameon of Elysian Landscapes created a fire-safe decomposed granite pad to surround a fire pit, creating a patio seating area in a Studio City garden. Photograph by Laure Joliet.

“There’s no one season for fire risk across the country,” Steinberg says. “It may seem unlikely, but we get a lot of brush fires in Massachusetts in April. People will say, ‘It’s a nice warm spring day, let’s light up the fire pit in the backyard.’ They’re not aware that wind can pick up embers and carry them away, and in dry conditions that can lead to fire.” Steinberg’s advice: Use a fire pit with extreme caution, and not before checking with the National Weather Service to see if a fire warning has been issued for your area.

10. Use common sense.

Photograph by Meredith Swinehart.
Above: Photograph by Meredith Swinehart.

Do we even need to say this? Make sure your hoses are in good shape for use in an emergency. Store firewood well away from the house. In fire season, refuel your lawn mower far from flammable materials. And don’t keep propane tanks near the house.

For more information about fire-safe gardening, go to Firewise USA.

N.B.: This post is an update; it was first published in 2020.

(Visited 6,908 times, 3 visits today)
You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Frequently asked questions

What is a fire-safe garden?

A fire-safe garden is a landscape design that incorporates elements and practices to reduce the risk of fire. These elements include using fire-resistant plants, creating defensible space, and implementing proper maintenance and irrigation techniques.

Why should I create a fire-safe garden?

Creating a fire-safe garden helps protect your property from wildfires. It reduces the fuel source for fires and provides a buffer zone between your home and the surrounding vegetation, decreasing the chance of your house catching fire during a wildfire.

Which plants are considered fire-resistant?

Fire-resistant plants are those that have a high moisture content, minimal sap or resin content, and a low volatile oil content. Examples of fire-resistant plants include succulents, deciduous trees, and groundcovers like ice plant and creeping thyme.

What is defensible space?

Defensible space is an area around your home where vegetation, debris, and other flammable materials are properly managed, reducing the likelihood of the house igniting from radiant heat or direct flame contact.

How do I create defensible space?

To create defensible space, start by clearing flammable materials from a minimum of 30 feet around your home. This includes removing dead plants, dry leaves, and branches. Use fire-resistant mulch and maintain a well-irrigated zone.

What are some maintenance practices for a fire-safe garden?

Regular maintenance practices for a fire-safe garden include keeping plants pruned and free from dead or dry material, removing fallen leaves and debris, and keeping the irrigation system in good working order. Regularly check and clean gutters to prevent them from becoming clogged with flammable debris.

How can I make my garden more fire-resistant?

To make your garden more fire-resistant, choose plants with fire-resistant characteristics, create proper spacing between plants, use non-combustible materials for hardscaping features, and maintain a well-watered and properly maintained landscape.

What should I consider when designing a fire-safe garden?

When designing a fire-safe garden, consider factors such as plant selection, spacing between plants and structures, use of fire-resistant materials, proper irrigation, and creating a defensible space around your home.

Where can I find more information on fire-safe gardening?

For more information on fire-safe gardening, you can consult local fire departments, garden centers, and resources like the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) or the University of California Cooperative Extension.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0