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Before and After: A Rustic Facade Adds Curb Appeal to a Plain Jane Ranch House

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Before and After: A Rustic Facade Adds Curb Appeal to a Plain Jane Ranch House

January 25, 2015

Tucked inconspicuously among a block of innocuous stucco ranch houses on a side street in St. Helena in Napa County, CA, a reclaimed wood facade attracts instant notice. A closer inspection reveals a surprise:

Photography by Mimi Giboin.

Above: You can’t tell from the street that beneath the wood siding lies a stucco house.

Before

Above: Here’s what the house looked like when homeowners Kevin and Jessica Hague bought it.

Above: After covering the front facade with wood, the Hagues began working on the side walls.

Above: On the back wall of the ranch house, a window is framed in reclaimed wood: step one to covering the entire wall.

Above: Ready to be installed: 1-by-6-inch planks of weathered wood, previously used on a fence

After

Above: The Hagues’ house has a board on board facade. Similar to a board and batten technique, a board on board installation typically involves installing planks vertically, side by side. Additional planks are cover the gaps between boards.

Above: A climbing rose is at home on the reclaimed wood siding, which came from Centennial Woods in Wyoming. Says Jessica Hague: “It was an absolute gamble–I  bought the material sight unseen.”

Above: To install the siding, the Hagues first screwed horizontal boards into the stucco facade. Then they nailed the vertical planks to the boards.

Above: For lights similar to the pendants flanking the doorway on the Hagues’ peaked-roof barn, Outdoor Wall Lanterns in a bronze finish are $495 apiece from Visual Comfort Lighting.

Are you looking for ways to add curb appeal to your house? See:

Finally, get more ideas on how to upgrade your home’s facade with our Hardscaping 101: Exteriors & Facades design guide.

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