Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
Search

Butterburs Petasites japonicus

Growing Butterburs: Tips at a Glance

Butterburs are a perennial ground cover best suited to wet soil at the edge of a pond, stream, marsh, or river. With their fast-growing root systems, they can create a dense mat of ground cover to prevent erosion on a slope.

  • Type Groundcover
  • Lifespan Perennial
  • USDA Zones 4-9
  • Light Partial shade
  • Soil Moist
  • When to Plant Spring
  • Design Tip Enormous leaves
  • Companions Arums
  • Peak Season Cabbage flowers in spring

Butterburs 101: A Field Guide

Native to Asia, giant butterburs (Petasites japonicus) have the curious ability to emerge in early spring as clumps of cauliflower-shaped posies and by summertime to grow enormous 3-foot leaves that act as a dense ground cover, only to die back completely in winter.

Perennial butterburs are happiest in moist soil, at the edge of a pond, marsh, or river in a temperate climate (they are winter hardy in USDA growing zones 4 to 9). Tip: This is a plant to admire from a distance rather than to try to wade through its quilt of rhizomatous roots.

For more plants to site at water’s edge, see pond garden choices in Hardscaping 101: Natural Swimming Pools.

Planting, Care & Design of Butterburs

More About Butterburs

v5.0