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Cape Rush Chondropetalum

Growing Cape Rush: Tips at a Glance

Cape rush looks like an ornamental grass and stands up to dry or windy conditions—but is evergreen, offering year-round appeal instead of sad brown clumps in winter.

  • Type Grassy evergreen
  • Lifespan Perennial
  • USDA Zones 8-11
  • Light Full or part sun
  • Water Drought tolerant
  • Foliage Reeds
  • Design Tip Airy border plant
  • Companions Salvia, lavender
  • Peak Season Year-round

Cape Rush 101: A Field Guide

Cape rush is not technically a grass; it’s a tufted perennial that grows in clumps with long, reedy leaf sheaths.

Although Chondropetalum looks like an airy grass with its foliage waving in a breeze, it’s actually an evergreen plant that hails from the Cape region in South Africa. (Historically, its leaves also have been used to thatch roofs and in brooms.)

In a landscape, cape rush creates an attractive perimeter if planted in clumps at the edge of a garden, alongside a path, or behind a fence.

Like many grasses, cape rush is tufted and sprays outward from a central clump of roots. Its hardy adaptability (you can grow it anywhere from a windswept seaside garden, to a dry landscape, to the edge of a pond). Cape rush is a happy companion to Salvia, Lavender, and other Grasses.

Planting, Care & Design of Cape Rush

More About Cape Rush

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