Giving New Meaning to the Term Treehouse by

Issue 92 · Tree Huggers · October 1, 2013

Giving New Meaning to the Term Treehouse

Issue 92 · Tree Huggers · October 1, 2013

We're familiar with the custom of bringing trees inside—Michelle and her Fiddle Leaf Fig are getting on splendidly, thanks for asking—but Dana Hughes of Yellowtrace has spotted a different kind of interior tree trend that goes one step further. 

Rather than limiting themselves to a modestly sized tree in a pot, these architects, designers, and homeowners have opted to incorporate trees into the architecture itself. In some cases, the trees are actually structural. We're sharing a few of our favorite examples below; for the full post, head to Yellowtrace.

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: An olive tree encased in a green aquarium inside Kook Osteria and Pizzeria in Lazio, Italy. Photograph by Filipo Vinardi. Kind of a like a over-sized version of Terra Hydro's vases, don't you think?

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: These two trees were cut from the site where the current house sits, smoked and dried to remove the water content, and repurposed as structural elements inside the house. Photograph by Daici Ano

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: For a spot of green, the branches of this pine tree were cut and dried and then festooned with lifelike plastic needles to mimic the real thing. 

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: Real tree trunks are featured prominently in this Japanese kindergarten classroom. Lucky kiddos. Photograph by Masaya Yoshimura.

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: This house boasts a nine-car garage for its sports car-enthusiast owner; but if you ask us, the towering tree in the atrium steals the show. Photograph by Torimura Koichi.

Bringing Big Trees Inside | Gardenista

Above: An extension of the Charleroi Museum of Photography in Belgium was built on the grounds of a former orchard; indoor trees seemingly pay tribute to the land's former use. Photograph by Gilbert Fastenaekens.

Interested in seeing a more traditional treehouse? How about a red one?



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