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Outbuilding of the Week: Tiny Cabins in a Norwegian Wood

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Outbuilding of the Week: Tiny Cabins in a Norwegian Wood

May 5, 2017

In the coastal town of Herfell, Norway, about an hour and a half’s drive south from Oslo, architects Reiulf Ramstad designed a “micro cluster” of three tiny holiday cabins for a family that likes to vacation together while still maintaining privacy.

Photography courtesy of  Reiulf Ramstad Architects.

Above: The three separate cabins are built around a central outdoor space where several generations of family members can congregate. The clients are a couple with two grown sons (both of whom were expecting babies).

Above: The compound also includes a small wood shed. The peaked timber structures, clad in untreated wood sourced locally, have windows that face a bucolic view of rolling, forested land.

Above: The cluster includes two separate bedroom cabins as well as a communal dining and living space. Inside a small cabin, a sleeping loft creates additional living space.

Above: “Each of the buildings is defined as a clarified geometric volume, organized around the outdoor area that binds them together as one unit,” the architects says.

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Above: The cabins, sited at the base of a stony hillside, are in an isolated spot where the natural surroundings are the nearest neighbors.

For more of our favorite Norwegian architects’ outbuildings, see:

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