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Events: Bicycles at London Design Week

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Events: Bicycles at London Design Week

Christine Chang Hanway October 04, 2011

Bicycle design has come a long way since our first Schwinns. During the 2011 London Design Festival, I came across several new bicycle designs, which are tapping into the way we like to get around the city these days. For more photos, including a spectacular bike rack/bookcase from Tamasine Osher, see our Facebook album: London Design Week; Bicycles.

Above: Tokyo Bikes are lightweight and have been designed with comfort in mind over speed; they’re perfect for riding around cities. For more information, go to Tokyo Bike.

Above: Australian designer Gary Galego designed the Carbonwood bike to explore the possibilities of a composite-material frame. The bike’s carbon-fiber frame is sandwiched within a wooden frame, resulting in a bike that has a comparable strength to one made of steel. For more information, go to Matilda.

Above: An object of pure beauty, the aoi.cycle’s stainless steel curved frame is welded by hand. For more information, go to aoi.cycle.

Above: An alternative to the bicycle, Swifty Scooters are made for adults and can be folded up easily for commuter portability; £450.

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