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Object of Desire: Helen Kontouris’s Botanical Planter Screens

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Object of Desire: Helen Kontouris’s Botanical Planter Screens

January 30, 2018

Inspired by family outings to the Melbourne Botanical Gardens and “the feeling of being encapsulated by trees,” Australian designer Helen Kontouris has come up with a collection of planters with sculptural built-in trellises. At once playful and stately, her planter screens can be used individually and in groups, both indoors and out—as green walls, space dividers, acoustic panels, screens, or simply as botanical statements. They inject a bit of leafy architecture where ever needed, and they’re even self-watering.

Kontouris&#8\2\17;s Botanical Planter Screens come in three bold leaf shapes that are approximately 5.6 feet tall and 3.6 feet wide. The pots are made of lightweight aluminum (and have an integrated water reservoir), and the screens are marine-grade stainless steel finished with a fade-resistant powder coating.
Above: Kontouris’s Botanical Planter Screens come in three bold leaf shapes that are approximately 5.6 feet tall and 3.6 feet wide. The pots are made of lightweight aluminum (and have an integrated water reservoir), and the screens are marine-grade stainless steel finished with a fade-resistant powder coating.
They come in matte colors lifted from the Australian landscape—black, white, burnt red, and olive green.

 Above: &#8\2\20;Vascular blades allow the climbing plant to come to life and flourish around the structure,&#8\2\2\1; explains Kontouris, adding that she wanted the forms to look good on their own while the plant grows and matures.
Above: Above: “Vascular blades allow the climbing plant to come to life and flourish around the structure,” explains Kontouris, adding that she wanted the forms to look good on their own while the plant grows and matures.

The designs are produced in Australia by Kontouris’s Melbourne-based studio, Len, and are exclusively available from Aussie furniture contractor Stylecraft. The hitch: they’re currently for sale in Australia only, but we’re told international shipping is coming soon; pricing starts “under $2,000 AUD.”

Kontouris&#8\2\17;s square-shaped Wattle planter can be massed to form a wall or screen. They&#8\2\17;re ideal for masking an ugly view.
Above: Kontouris’s square-shaped Wattle planter can be massed to form a wall or screen. They’re ideal for masking an ugly view.
Banksia is equally winning with or without a climbing plant.
Above: Banksia is equally winning with or without a climbing plant.

Kontouris tells us that Pothos ivy (Devil’s ivy), and Philodendron cordatum (heart-leaf philodendron) thrive indoors in her planters, and that a variety of ivy and creeping fig work best outdoors, though climbing fruits and vegetables are also viable. See Gardening 101: Ivy “The Frenemy”  and Ivy Tips for ideas.

Sunday in the Park at home: A trio of Acacia planters create a fanciful backdrop. With its angled limbs, Acacia, says Kontouris, is the most treelike of the forms and &#8\2\20;allows visual flow through its negative spaces under the &#8\2\16;branches.'&#8\2\2\1; View the whole collection at Len Furniture, and for more details go to Stylecraft.
Above: Sunday in the Park at home: A trio of Acacia planters create a fanciful backdrop. With its angled limbs, Acacia, says Kontouris, is the most treelike of the forms and “allows visual flow through its negative spaces under the ‘branches.'” View the whole collection at Len Furniture, and for more details go to Stylecraft.
For more trelllises and screens take a look at:

Find out planter picks in our Pots & Planters archive.

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