Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

A Christmas Tree by Post

Search

A Christmas Tree by Post

November 26, 2012

It was once believed widely (at least by members of my family) that babies came from storks and Christmas trees came from the YMCA.

This was where my brothers and I tagged along every year as my mother ruthlessly scrutinized every tree in the parking lot, seeking perfection. It was a limited selection, and nobody found it a bit surprising the year she bribed Mr. YMCA (if that was his name) to sell her a Scotch pine marked “Reserved” for the nuns at a local convent.

These days, there’s a lot more choice and Christmas trees come from the Internet. One year, I ordered a six-foot-tall pine from a tree farm in Cadillac, Michigan; UPS delivered it in a cardboard box. For this holiday season, a tabletop Fraser fir comes in a pail, from Terrain. Shipping starts today:

Above: Approximately three feet tall, the Tabletop Fraser Fir comes in a galvanized pail; $58.

Above: Give the tree’s trunk a new cut so it will absorb water and stay fresh longer.

Above: Named for 18th century Scottish botanist John Fraser, the fir gives off a light scent and has leaves that look like soft needles; they won’t scratch you when you hang an ornament.

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0