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Hardscape 101

Hardscape 101: Design Guides

If you’re designing a new outdoor space (or overhauling the hardscape you already have), we’ll help guide you, from beginning to end.

Start by dreaming big—you can rein in your wildest ideas later, if need be. Make a list (even if it’s a mile long) of everything you want in your landscape: deck, patio, swimming pool, outdoor kitchen, edible garden, outdoor shower. Then use our Design Guides to help you separate the musts from the maybes.

Pore over our Hardscape 101 design guides to see thousands of images of garden spaces to find what you love, with an eye to style, colors, materials, and furniture. You’ll see certain themes emerge—and then you’ll be ready to set a budget.

Where to splurge and where to save? Some things worth spending on: a master plan, masonry to give your garden good bones, quality materials to withstand the elements, privacy, and craftsmanship. Ways to save: use gravel instead of pavers on paths, reuse existing materials (bricks, stone, pickets), buyer smaller plants, and use mix-and-match furniture.

Small details can have big impact in a landscape. Make sure hardscape materials—stone, pavers, concrete, gravel, wood, paint, hardware—all work together, and also complement your house’s architectural style.

In our Hardscape 101 design guides, it’s our mission to demystify garden design. And remember: it doesn’t matter if you’re a first timer or a master gardener: you can do this.

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