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Required Reading: In Full Flower

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Required Reading: In Full Flower

May 19, 2017

As a landscape designer constantly surrounded by flora and fauna, petals and patterns, I perennially pick through gardens, arranging my finds in vases around my house (and my clients’). However—and this is quite a large however—I have been put in my place, inspired beyond imagination, by the new book In Full Flower: Inspired Designs By Floral’s New Creatives, by authors Gemma and Andrew Ingalls.

In Full Flower is a collection of rich and delicate photographs, free-form floral arrangements, plus insightful writings on each artist’s philosophy and inspirations. The book celebrates influential contemporary floral designers and it reads like floral poetry. Although what you see on the pages is a record of fleeting beauty,  the wild magic of the arrangements will live on in your creative soul.

Here are a few of my favorites, enjoy:

All photography by Gemma and Andrew Ingalls.

Above: Floral artist Holly Carlisle, inspired by abstract painters such Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, reinvents Ikebana, as seen in this precise but playful composition of roses, dogwood, and other beauties.
Above: This arrangement highlights Max Gill’s current “hellebore addiction” mixed with his need for vine incorporation.

Max Gill from Berkeley, California is my favorite floral artist in the collection, and thank goodness there are multiple examples of his work featured in the book.  He deftly incorporates citrus branches (with fruit intact), stems of fruiting raspberries, and lush symbiotic layers—all procured from his own cutting garden.

Above: Ashley Beyer’s organically romantic arrangement feels effortless yet obviously required a fine-tuned hand.

Ashley Beyer comments, “I am constantly challenging myself to push new color palettes or find new ways to marry two unexpected colors together in pleasing ways.” What I appreciate about In Full Bloom is that readers get a front row seat into the floral artists’ creative processes.

Above: A collection of fragrant peonies joyfully explodes out the vase in this arrangement by Ariella Chezar. Consisting of only one type of flower, the arrangement proves you don’t need an elaborate cutting garden to create beauty.

In Full Flower, published by Rizzoli, is \$\28.46 from Amazon.
Above: In Full Flower, published by Rizzoli, is $28.46 from Amazon.
For more of our favorite floral arrangements, see:

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