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Outbuilding of the Week: A Stylish Swedish Outhouse

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Outbuilding of the Week: A Stylish Swedish Outhouse

March 7, 2014

This might not be the most delicate of topics, but consider this: you’re out for a refreshing spring hike when you find yourself in the middle of the woods with nary an outhouse in sight. Wouldn’t you be comforted by the prospect of a beautiful little space to “freshen up” before carrying along? 

A traditional Swedish utedass–or privy–is a detached building often sited next to cabins in rural areas. So-called wilderness toilets are an important cultural reminder of the outdoorsy, old-fashioned mode of life embraced by occupants (and house guests) of traditional Swedish summer houses. Austere in design, these privies often have walls built of scrap wood and, inside, a simple wooden bench.

Photographs courtesy of General Architecture.

Above: Swedish firm General Architecture built this outhouse on a simple concrete foundation in the forest of Bergslagen.

Above: Inside, bare wood and a simple bronze bucket. Outside, charred wood siding that manages to look simultaneously chic and rustic. 

To learn more about charred siding head to Remodelista’s post Remodeling 101: Shou Sugi Ban Wood as Siding and Flooring

Drawn to the black facade? See Trend Alert: Black Fences for more ways to add a touch of black to your yard.

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