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Object of Desire: Mayan-Inspired Woven Seating

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Object of Desire: Mayan-Inspired Woven Seating

April 21, 2023

Recently, I wrote about a chic Brooklyn condo for Remodelista (see Industrial Revolution: A New Red Hook Condo In Tune with the Neighborhood’s History). Among the many cool pieces of furniture in the home was one particular standout: an appealingly rustic, cushion-y woven chair.

Turns out it’s part of the “Icapalli” Tule Collection (icpalli means a throne in Aztec culture) by txt.ure for high-end Mexican furniture brand Luteca—and Remodelista wrote about back in 2017. Each piece features handwoven tule (Schoenoplectus acutus, a giant species of sedge), using a technique that dates back to the Mayan civilization. After a successful Kickstarter campaign, txt.ure built a workshop and began training indigenous craftspeople to make the pieces.

Here’s a look at the modern collection with an ancient history.

Photography via Luteca, unless otherwise noted.

Here&#8\2\17;s where I first spotted the chair, in a condo in Red Hook, Brooklyn, staged by Hollister and Porter Hovey, who were inspired to mix in Latin American designs because the space, with its lime plaster walls and arched windows and doorways, had a Spanish feel. Photograph by Hollister Hovey, from Industrial Revolution: A New Red Hook Condo In Tune with the Neighborhood’s History.
Above: Here’s where I first spotted the chair, in a condo in Red Hook, Brooklyn, staged by Hollister and Porter Hovey, who were inspired to mix in Latin American designs because the space, with its lime plaster walls and arched windows and doorways, had a Spanish feel. Photograph by Hollister Hovey, from Industrial Revolution: A New Red Hook Condo In Tune with the Neighborhood’s History.
The technique of tule knotting was first revived by txt.ure, a Mexican group devoted to resuscitating age-old craft traditions. The Tule Collection includes a chair, stool (in two sizes), and bench.
Above: The technique of tule knotting was first revived by txt.ure, a Mexican group devoted to resuscitating age-old craft traditions. The Tule Collection includes a chair, stool (in two sizes), and bench.
The bench is \$\1,499; the chair is \$\1,\250; the small stool is \$585; and the large stool is \$750.
Above: The bench is $1,499; the chair is $1,250; the small stool is $585; and the large stool is $750.
Tule was also heavily used by Native Americans, who wove baskets with it and even made tools and built homes with it.
Above: Tule was also heavily used by Native Americans, who wove baskets with it and even made tools and built homes with it.
The woven tule pieces can be used indoors and outdoors under cover.
Above: The woven tule pieces can be used indoors and outdoors under cover.

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