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A New World Composting Shed in Edinburgh

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A New World Composting Shed in Edinburgh

Meredith Swinehart July 25, 2012

A composting shed in Edinburgh makes clever use of heavy construction materials to blend in with a cheerful Scottish garden.

The shed. at Inverleith Terrace in Edinburgh, is in a garden adjacent to the Water of Leith Walkway (an urban nature footpath that follows the main river running through Edinburgh). The garden belongs to the owners of a home remodeled in 2003 by historical preservationists Groves-Raines Architects. The firm was called upon for a dual-purpose composting/storage shed, but this time not in the vein of historical preservation. Groves-Raines crafted a small but engaging shed at the farthest end of the garden, abutting the public walkway. Using heavy construction materials such as rebar and Cor-ten steel, the architects crafted a tiny space whose shape and color suggests it could have accompanied the Water of Leith through the ages.

Photography by Dan Farrar courtesy of Groves-Raines Architects.

Above: To make rebar at home in the garden, the architects used traditional willow weaving techniques to mimic woven reeds and branches.

Above: The woven technique allows for ventilation needed for composting.

Above: By embracing a five-ton boulder already sited in the garden, the shed blends with the place all the more.

Above: Like wandering through a giant basket; the enchanting sunlight inside changes throughout the day.

Above: The roof is made of weatherproof rubber, lined with steel and planted with “swaying” grasses.

Looking for more garden inspiration? See 53 images of UK Gardens in our Gallery of rooms and spaces.

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