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5 Favorites: Wind-Resistant Trees

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5 Favorites: Wind-Resistant Trees

September 17, 2017

In hurricane season, storms often uproot trees along the coastline. But some trees stand up better than others to wind. With winter weather ahead, we’ve rounded up a few favorites.

In addition to choosing a wind-resistant tree with strong branches and a hardy root system, make sure you buy varieties that thrive in your climate. Before purchasing a tree, check this Map to make sure it’s recommended for your USDA Plant Hardiness Zone.

American Holly Trees

Photograph by Britt Willoughby Dyer.
Above: Photograph by Britt Willoughby Dyer.

Above: Also known as an American Holly tree, Ilex opaca is hardy from growing zones 5 to 9.

Crape Myrtle Trees

Photograph by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr.
Above: Photograph by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr.

Above: Hardy from zones 6 to 10, Crape Myrtle flourishes in the South. There are many kinds, ranging from dwarf varieties under three feet tall to 30-foot-high specimens.

Green Ash Trees

Green Ash trees. Photograph by Matt Lavin via Flickr.
Above: Green Ash trees. Photograph by Matt Lavin via Flickr.

Above: Tolerant of heat and cold, as well as of both wet and dry soils, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, also known as a Green Ash Tree, grows as tall as 60 feet in zones 3 to 9.

Ginkgo Trees

Above: Reaching heights of up to 65 feet, Ginkgo Biloba ‘Autumn Gold’ will live longer than 150 years. Hardy from growing zones five to nine, it will tolerate poor or compacted soil. Photograph by by Andreas Trauttmansdorff.

For more of this garden, see Garden Visit: At Home with Canada’s Favorite Garden Writer.

Zelkova Trees

Photograph by Rexness via Flickr.
Above: Photograph by Rexness via Flickr.

Zelkova serrata, native to Asia, grows as tall as 50 feet and is hardy from growing zones 5 to 8.

For more tips on weather proofing your trees, see Surviving a Storm: Expert Tips from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

If you’re trying to decide which tree to plant in a landscape, see:

Product summary  

Crape Myrtle

Crape Myrtles

$32.13 USD from Nature Hills Nursery

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