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Trending on Remodelista: 5 Bold (Yet Tasteful) Ways to Add Color to Your Home

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Trending on Remodelista: 5 Bold (Yet Tasteful) Ways to Add Color to Your Home

May 17, 2019

We learned valuable lessons on Remodelista this week on how to use color in subtle yet surprising ways:

1. Practice restraint with bright hues.

Above: Susie Tompkins Buell, the co-founder of Esprit, stuck to mostly neutrals in her airy San Francisco penthouse—accented by bright bursts of green. See A Home at the Top of the World, San Francisco Edition for more of this apartment. Photograph by Laure Joliet for Remodelista.

2. Use muted colors in bold ways.

Alexa rounded up her \10 favorite Modern Bridge Faucets, and while the one shown here is stylish, it&#8\2\17;s the clever way this kitchen uses color-blocking—with a shallow ledge delineating the backsplash from the wall, painted in a complementary color—that stopped us. Photograph courtesy of Lanserring, from Kitchen of the Week: A Luxe European Kitchen System, Charcuterie Included.
Above: Alexa rounded up her 10 favorite Modern Bridge Faucets, and while the one shown here is stylish, it’s the clever way this kitchen uses color-blocking—with a shallow ledge delineating the backsplash from the wall, painted in a complementary color—that stopped us. Photograph courtesy of Lanserring, from Kitchen of the Week: A Luxe European Kitchen System, Charcuterie Included.

3. Paint a backsplash.

Above: A great backsplash hack that’s easy on the pocketbook: Simply paint one in! We especially like how this one is painted the same color (Farrow & Ball’s India Yellow) as the cabinets. Photograph courtesy of British Standard, from Kitchen of the Week: Stardust in Northwest London.

4. Commit to a strict two-toned palette.

Choose a two-hue palette for truly bold and impactful results. This white and navy bath designed by architect Simon Astridge brilliantly illustrates this point. “All sanitary ware specified was white and blue, even down to the towel pegs,” he says. Photograph by Rory Gardiner, from Under the Eaves: A Brick House Reinvention in South London by Simon Astridge.
Above: Choose a two-hue palette for truly bold and impactful results. This white and navy bath designed by architect Simon Astridge brilliantly illustrates this point. “All sanitary ware specified was white and blue, even down to the towel pegs,” he says. Photograph by Rory Gardiner, from Under the Eaves: A Brick House Reinvention in South London by Simon Astridge.

5. Paint the furniture, not the walls.

Painting wood furniture is a great way to work in color—especially for commitment-phobes who are afraid of covering entire walls with a single hue. Here, Justine gave a vintage bed a coat of Benjamin Moore&#8\2\17;s Nimbus, one of the colors featured in \10 Paint Colors with Cult Followings: Architects’ All-Time Favorite Paint Picks. Photograph by Matthew Williams.
Above: Painting wood furniture is a great way to work in color—especially for commitment-phobes who are afraid of covering entire walls with a single hue. Here, Justine gave a vintage bed a coat of Benjamin Moore’s Nimbus, one of the colors featured in 10 Paint Colors with Cult Followings: Architects’ All-Time Favorite Paint Picks. Photograph by Matthew Williams.

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