Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Gardening 101: Hoya Heart Plant

Search

Gardening 101: Hoya Heart Plant

February 14, 2024

Hoya Heart, Hoya kerrii

Who needs red roses for Valentine’s Day when there’s this sweetheart of a succulent that packs oodles of charm in a tiny package? While it’s true that nothing beats the smell of fresh roses, this heart-shaped plant wins when it comes to gifts that last.

Please keep reading to learn more about the hoya heart.

Single-leaf hoya hearts are starting to rival red roses when it comes to Valentine&#8\2\17;s Day presents. The Bouqs sells their Desert Love duo in pink pots for \$54.
Above: Single-leaf hoya hearts are starting to rival red roses when it comes to Valentine’s Day presents. The Bouqs sells their Desert Love duo in pink pots for $54.

Leading up to Valentine’s Day, single-leafed hoyas fly out of nurseries, florist shops, and garden centers. And you can see why: It’s petite, it’s heart-shaped, and its petals don’t fall off. Its cuteness seems tailor-made for the holiday. Just be advised that it won’t grow into one massive heart, nor will it sprout multiple hearts. That’s because the single leaf is rooted as a leaf cutting, not as a stem cutting with nodes. Still, that single leaf planted in well-draining soil can live for years. If you prefer a hoya heart plant that will grow multiple leaves, make sure to buy a rooted version that has at least two leaves.

Native to Southeast Asia, hoya heart is a tropical vining succulent with thick and waxy evergreen leaves. If conditions are right and you have a mature plant that’s a little root-bound (they like tight quarters), you will be gifted clusters of fragrant white blooms. But even without the flowers, the plant is attractive. I love houseplants that wind and weave, and especially when they trail down shelves, and some hoya heart stems might be as long as six feet or more.

Since hoya hearts come from tropical areas, they do appreciate some warmth and humidity. Either mist them every so often or place them on a steamy bathroom shelf. Another option if your home has dry air is to place your potted hoya on a bed of pebbles filled with water to add ambient moisture.

For bonus charm and uniqueness (and a bigger price tag), look for two unique varieties: Hoya kerrii ‘Variegata’ with yellow edges and Hoya kerrii ‘Splash’ with speckled leaves.

Cheat Sheet

The Variegated Hoya Heart is \$6\2 at The Sill (currently out of stock).
Above: The Variegated Hoya Heart is $62 at The Sill (currently out of stock).
  • Hoyas are easy-to-care-for houseplants.
  • Safe for cats and dogs to nibble on.
  • Great in a hanging basket or perched on a shelf so the cascading stems can be appreciated.
  • Consider using a pole or trellis if an upright appearance is desired. Pro tip: Hoya stems are not very flexible so start your trellis training early.

Keep It Alive

Photograph of Hoya kerrii &#8\2\16;Splash&#8\2\17; via Greenboog.
Above: Photograph of Hoya kerrii ‘Splash’ via Greenboog.
  • Plant in fast-draining cacti/succulent potting soil.
  • Tolerates medium light but performs better in bright indirect light.
  • Situate your hoya away from chilly drafts. Warmer locations are preferred.
  • If your outdoor temperatures dip below 50°F, keep this succulent inside for sure.
  • Like most other succulents, this plant is mostly undemanding but still appreciates water when the top layer of soil is dry. Thoroughly water, let the excess drain out, then wait about 7 days before watering again. Of course this frequency depends on the size of your pot and its location.
  • Reduce the watering in the winter when the plant is dormant.
  • Repot every three years or so when the roots get overly crowded and poke through the drain holes in your container. Do any repotting in the spring before new growth starts.

See also:

(Visited 13,118 times, 9 visits today)
You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0