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From Farm to Table at Los Poblanos Inn

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From Farm to Table at Los Poblanos Inn

August 10, 2012

Guests at Los Poblanos Inn in Albuquerque can volunteer to work in the 25-acre garden—a farm, really—which produces much of the food on the menu:

Photographs via Los Poblanos Inn.

Above: Santa Fe-based architect John Gaw Meem, known for designing Pueblo Revival styles homes, designed Los Poblanos Inn in 1932. For more about the inn, see “Hotels and Lodging: Los Poblanos in New Mexico.”

Above: Crops grown in the kitchen garden include o’odham cowpeas, casaba melons, brown tepary beans, and magdelena big cheese squash.

Above: Lavender oil distilled from the adjacent lavender fields is used in spa products at the inn.

Above: Every summer Los Poblanos hosts a lavender festival.

Above: Grosso lavender (L) is an especially fragrant and hardy variety. The farm’s crops include beets and radishes (R).

Above: Organic grass-fed lamb is produced by the Manzanares family ranch in northern New Mexico’s mountains.

Above: The inn serves foods indigenous to the Rio Grande River Valley.

Above: Ristras of Chimayo chiles grown on the farm.

Above: The inn’s cooking classes are held in a re-purposed 1930’s industrial space. (N.B.: For more destinations in New Mexico, see our City Guides.)

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