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Expert Advice: Architects’ Favorite Porch Paint Colors

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Expert Advice: Architects’ Favorite Porch Paint Colors

September 7, 2017

Like a bathroom or bedroom—out-of-the-way rooms that offer an opportunity to experiment with paint color—an outdoor porch is a place where you can live a little. A porch requires less commitment than painting a facade (both in expense and expanse), and is a great place to try an accent or otherwise bolder color than you might typically choose.

For ideas, we turned to members of the Gardenista Architect/Designer Directory for some of their own favorite porch palettes. Here are their favorite colors:

Kelly-Moore New Linen

Above: For her own front porch, architect Kelly Haegglund chose New Linen by Kelly-Moore with Benjamin Moore’s Dark Lime on the door (she says “it’s modern, and a complement to the greens and purples in the garden”). See the rest of the landscape in Garden Visit: At Home with Architect Kelly Haegglund in Mill Valley, CA. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

Donald Kaufman DKC-44

Above: Brooklyn-based O’Neill Rose Architects partnered with Donald Kaufman Color on the paint palette for this Connecticut house. They chose DKC-44, a lightest blue, for the porch floor and ceiling. See more in The Architect Is In: Porch Appreciation in Connecticut. Photograph by Michael Moran, courtesy of O’Neill Rose.

Mix-and-Match Colors

Above: Emerick Architects submitted this Portland, Oregon dining porch to our Considered Design Awards contest. They had the floor painted in Ralph Lauren Cinderblock, walls and ceilings in Whip by Devine Paint, window trim in Shell by Devine, and the window sashes painted in Spicy Mustard by Benjamin Moore. Click to see the rest of the Coastal Dining Porch submission. Photograph courtesy of Emerick Architects.

Benjamin Moore Summer Blue

Above: Greenwich, Connecticut landscape architect Janice Parker likes Summer Blue by Benjamin Moore as a porch accent color: “It’s a subtle and inviting way to add an exterior pop of color that mimics the natural surroundings,” she said. Photo by Neil Landino, courtesy of Janice Parker.

Benjamin Moore Simply White

Above: In collaboration with midcentury furniture dealer Larry Weinberg, NYC interior design firm 2Michaels chose Benjamin Moore’s Simply White for this screened porch on Martha’s Vineyard. The shade is one of our Architects’ White Exterior Paint Picks. Photograph courtesy of 2Michaels.

Benjamin Moore Stonington Gray

Above: Remodelista contributor Christine Chang Hanway, an architect and founder of the site Fabulous Fabsters, chose a subtle gray (Stonington Gray Paint) paired with a shocking rose (Countryside Pink Paint) for the porch of her Connecticut country house. Read the juicy details in A Scandal in New England (Pink Paint Is Involved). Photograph by Christine Chang Hanway for Remodelista.

Benjamin Moore Bennington Gray

Above: Austin interior designer Ann Edgerton added a screened porch to her own family home on the Llano River. She chose Benjamin Moore’s warm Bennington Gray to match the desert and added color via the furnishings. See the rest in Steal This Look: A Bohemian Screened Porch in Texas. Photograph by Molly Winters, courtesy of Ann Edgerton.

Behr Underwater

Above: Design-build firm Jersey Ice Cream Co. transformed the porch of an 18th century summer house in the Catskills using Behr paint in gray-blue Underwater. See the rest in Before and After: A Summer Porch Rehab in Upstate New York. Photograph courtesy of Jersey Ice Cream Co.

Donald Kaufman DKC-26

For the screened porch of their own weekend home—a former farmer’s cottage—in Rhinebeck, New York, architects Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown chose Donald Kaufman Color DKC-\26, a dark gray-green. The door leading from the porch to the house (visible in the post below) is DKC-\23. See the rest in Steal This Look: The Perfect Screened Porch. Photograph by Richard Powers, courtesy of Tsao & McKown Architects.
Above: For the screened porch of their own weekend home—a former farmer’s cottage—in Rhinebeck, New York, architects Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown chose Donald Kaufman Color DKC-26, a dark gray-green. The door leading from the porch to the house (visible in the post below) is DKC-23. See the rest in Steal This Look: The Perfect Screened Porch. Photograph by Richard Powers, courtesy of Tsao & McKown Architects.

Valhalla Lifetime

New York&#8\2\17;s BarlisWedlick Architects designed a family compound in New York&#8\2\17;s Hudson Valley with a three-story screened porch. It&#8\2\17;s made of Alaskan yellow cedar finished with Lifetime wood treatment by Valhalla. &#8\2\20;We like the way the gray wood blends into the natural surroundings,&#8\2\2\1; said firm interior designer Elaine Santos. See the rest in Architect Visit: A Natural Pool and Passive House in New York’s Hudson Valley. Photograph by Reto Guntli, courtesy of BarlisWedlick.
Above: New York’s BarlisWedlick Architects designed a family compound in New York’s Hudson Valley with a three-story screened porch. It’s made of Alaskan yellow cedar finished with Lifetime wood treatment by Valhalla. “We like the way the gray wood blends into the natural surroundings,” said firm interior designer Elaine Santos. See the rest in Architect Visit: A Natural Pool and Passive House in New York’s Hudson Valley. Photograph by Reto Guntli, courtesy of BarlisWedlick.

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