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DIY: Tiny Clay Pot for Succulents

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DIY: Tiny Clay Pot for Succulents

March 15, 2013

I know, I know. After an all-day slog to make a padded Silverware Drawer Insert, I vowed less than a week ago never to do another DIY project. But who can resist these tiny clay pots—and they look so easy to make—that I saw on Transient Expression? All you have to do is hollow out a spot for the tiny succulent to grow, cut faceted sides with a knife, and—you’re done.

For step-by-step instructions and a materials list, see Transient Expressions.

Photographs via Transient Expression.

Above: The finished product: instant Lilliputian succulent garden.

Above: Start with white Sculpey Premo Clay ($16.49 from Utrecht) rolled into a ball (and frozen for a few minutes). Enter the melon baller. For full instructions, see Transient Expression.

Above: You need to dig out enough clay to give the plant’s roots room to spread.

Above: Use a sharp knife to cut facets, bake it in the oven, and fill it with tiny plants. Or you can use the clay to make a hanging plant holder if you prefer; see Transient Expression for the details.

For more of our favorite tiny house plants, see 5 Favorites: Mini House Plants for Apartment Living.

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