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Spinach Spinacia oleracea

Growing Spinach: Tips at a Glance

  • Type Edible
  • Lifespan Annual
  • USDA Zones 3-9
  • Light Sun to partial shade
  • Water Consistently
  • When to Plant Spring, fall
  • Soil Well-drained
  • Temperature Prefers 35-75 degrees
  • Days to Maturity 25-50
  • Eating It Since 1931 Popeye

How to Successfully Grow Spinach: A Field Guide

For maximum nutritional punch, spinach is a shining farm-to-table star. It likes sandy soil and cool temperatures. 

Varieties of spinach fall roughly into three groups. Flat-leaf, the most popular, is smooth with teardrop-shape leaves. Savoy and semi-savoy are wrinkly and more intense in flavor. Sow seeds in spring and plant a second crop in autumn. In mild climates, try mulching with straw to keep your crop active through winter. Spinach is fast-growing. Pick the outer leaves first and watch for bolting, or flowering. If it bolts, it’s bitter.

Planting, Care & Design of Spinach

More About Spinach

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