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Black-Eyed Peas Vigna unguiculata

Growing Black-Eyed Peas: Tips at a Glance

  • Type Legume
  • Life Span Annual
  • USDA Zones 3-11
  • Light Full sun
  • Water Drought tolerant
  • Where to Plant In warm soil
  • Design Tip Trellis or fence
  • Growing Season Spring through summer
  • Days to Maturity 60-90, or so

Black-Eyed Peas: A Field Guide

From the Carolinas to India to the Caribbean, black-eyed peas are a local favorite.

Jews have been serving black-eyed peas on Rosh Hashanah for 2,500 years. In the South, eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day is meant to bring prosperity.

Harvest as a snap bean about 60 days after geminating or as a dry bean after 90. For an ongoing crop, plant every two weeks. Many heirloom varieties are available, with eyes of black, brown, red, pink, or green. Plant eye down and wait. Texas caviar (black-eyed peas marinated in a vinaigrette with garlic, served cold) is on its way.

Planting, Care & Design of Black-Eyed Peas

More About Black-Eyed Peas

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