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Tiny House Tryout: How Does It Feel to Live in 160 Square Feet?

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Tiny House Tryout: How Does It Feel to Live in 160 Square Feet?

October 9, 2015

You’ve heard the hype. Now would you like to know what it really feels like to live in a tiny, 160-square-foot cabin? You can rent one in the woods in New England (two hours’ drive from Boston) for $99 a night. Pack light.

Designed by Getaway, a startup founded by two Harvard students, the three cabins are meant to be as much social experiment as  weekend lark. “There’s a huge gap between people who post stories to Facebook about living in tiny houses and people who actually live in one,” Getaway co-founder Pete Davis told Fast Company.

Photography by Kataram Studios courtesy of Getaway.

Above: One of three tiny cabins, the Ovida sleeps four. Each cabin is sited in a different mystery location: “We will notify you of your specific location 24 hours before your trip,” Getaway co-founders Davis and Jon Staff promise. “The adventure is part of the fun, so sit back and enjoy the magic.”

Above: Designed by student architects, the Ovida is furnished with a queen-size bed, two twin-bed sleeping nooks, a kitchenette, a dining table and two chairs, and an upstairs loft.

Above: The kitchenette has a hot plate, a Coleman cooler, and a transom window, offering a view that would have satisfied Henry David Thoreau.

Above: Provisions await. The pantry items “can vary by stay, but you could find any of these food items in stock: coffee, hot chocolate, tea, granola, cereal, rice, soup mix, pasta, pasta sauce, trail mix, beef jerky, a s’mores kit, and more,” says Getaway.

Above: Getaway’s FAQ has answers to such questions as “Are the toilets weird?” (Answer: no, they’re composting toilets); “Can I bring my dog?” (yes); “Is there a minimum age to book?” (18), and “Will I get cell phone reception in the woods?” If you asked that last question, maybe this experiment isn’t for you.

Above: Without cell reception, how will you upload this photo to Instagram?

Above: A campfire pit is on site. Please use firewood provided and do not cut down additional trees.

Craving the teeny, tiny life? See:

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