Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

The Cult of Cécile: A Parisian Ceramist’s Perfect Flower Vases

Search

The Cult of Cécile: A Parisian Ceramist’s Perfect Flower Vases

July 7, 2015

Paris-based ceramicist Cécile Daladier’s delicate, hand-formed vases show off the charms of single stems–any flower, really, that you picked a minute ago from the garden.

We love Daladier’s work so much that we sent Alexa to France to visit her studio a few months ago. Now that her tiny, one-of-a-kind vases are on offer at Portland, Oregon-based Alder & Co., the big question around here is: which one do we want most?

Above: Says Alexa, “Cécile’s pieces begin with clay derived from the earth in the Drí´me in southeastern France. She mixes it in an industrial bread mixer. When firing each piece over an open flame, she wears a rubber bodysuit and mask for protection, and must add wood constantly to keep the fire burning strong. When she extracts the pottery at peak temperature, the pieces still glow red from the heat.”

Above: A round white and gray vase with five cylinders to hold flower stems, Ceramic Piece No. 2 is 5 inches wide and 4 inches tall; $315 from Alder & Co.

Above: The internal cylinders serve the same practical purpose as a florist’s frog; they hold individual stems in place.

Above: A small glazed ivory vase with gray crackles has seven holes for individual stems; the Ceramic Piece No. 7 is $115.

Above: A round, chalk-colored bud vase has one small hole. The Ceramic Piece No. 8 measures 2.5 inches wide by 2 inches tall and is $115.

Above: Blush pink, a tiny round vase with six holes measures 1 inch tall and 2.5 inches wide; Ceramic Piece No. 6 is $115.

Above: Ceramic Piece No. 1 can accommodate a garden’s worth of flowers; it has both tall cylinders and small holes and is $315.

Above: Daladier’s ceramic pieces, on display in her light-filled studio in Paris.

See more of Daladier’s work in:

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0