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DIY: The 7 Best Natural Mosquito Bite Remedies

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DIY: The 7 Best Natural Mosquito Bite Remedies

June 19, 2019

I’m a romantic, and so at the risk of facing commenter-wrath, I’m going to say it: The season’s first mosquito bite isn’t such a bad thing. It’s how you earn your summertime stripes, don’t you think?

No? Romantic notions about insects aside, by the time the first bite has turned into 40 even I’m ready for relief.

In case you haven’t gotten around to making a batch of DIY: Bug Repellent Balm–and we suggest you do–we present you with some natural remedies for mosquito bites to banish chalky pink Calamine lotion forever.

Photography by Erin Boyle.

My arsenal of natural mosquito-bite remedies. We&#8\2\17;re sharing seven of our favorite remedies here, but if you&#8\2\17;ve had good luck with others, please let us know in the comments section below.
Above: My arsenal of natural mosquito-bite remedies. We’re sharing seven of our favorite remedies here, but if you’ve had good luck with others, please let us know in the comments section below.

Ice Cubes

An ice cube or cold pack can be a surprisingly effective remedy for mosquito bites. The ice numbs the area and helps control swelling. Wrap cubes in a towel and press against bites for \10 minutes (or for as long as you can tolerate).
Above: An ice cube or cold pack can be a surprisingly effective remedy for mosquito bites. The ice numbs the area and helps control swelling. Wrap cubes in a towel and press against bites for 10 minutes (or for as long as you can tolerate).

Tea Bags

Natural tannins in tea act as an astringent, drawing toxins out of the skin and helping to lessen your discomfort. Press a used tea bag against your bites until the itching subsides.
Above: Natural tannins in tea act as an astringent, drawing toxins out of the skin and helping to lessen your discomfort. Press a used tea bag against your bites until the itching subsides.

Tea Tree Essential Oil

Antiseptic properties in tea tree oil help it treat a variety of skin-related symptoms, including mosquito bites. Dab a little essential oil onto a cotton swab and rub it on the affected area. Lavender and peppermint oils also work well. A caveat: Some people are sensitive to having essential oils applied directly to the skin. If that&#8\2\17;s the case for you, try diluting the oil or choose a different remedy. (You can buy a \1-ounce bottle of Tea Tree Oil from iHerb.com for \$8.99.)
Above: Antiseptic properties in tea tree oil help it treat a variety of skin-related symptoms, including mosquito bites. Dab a little essential oil onto a cotton swab and rub it on the affected area. Lavender and peppermint oils also work well. A caveat: Some people are sensitive to having essential oils applied directly to the skin. If that’s the case for you, try diluting the oil or choose a different remedy. (You can buy a 1-ounce bottle of Tea Tree Oil from iHerb.com for $8.99.)

Baking Soda Paste

Add a few drops of water to some baking soda, mix it into a paste, apply it directly onto bug bites, and allow to dry. The alkalinity of baking soda can help neutralize the pH of an infected area and reduce itching.
Above: Add a few drops of water to some baking soda, mix it into a paste, apply it directly onto bug bites, and allow to dry. The alkalinity of baking soda can help neutralize the pH of an infected area and reduce itching.

Apple Cider Vinegar

In the same way that baking soda can neutralize a bug bite, a swab of apple cider vinegar (or a few cupfuls diluted in a bath) can help balance the pH of an infected area. Apple cider vinegar is less acidic than other vinegars and a good choice for restoring natural pH.
Above: In the same way that baking soda can neutralize a bug bite, a swab of apple cider vinegar (or a few cupfuls diluted in a bath) can help balance the pH of an infected area. Apple cider vinegar is less acidic than other vinegars and a good choice for restoring natural pH.

Aloe Vera

Often associated with relieving painful sunburns, aloe vera is also helpful for mosquito bites. Make your own at DIY: A Soothing Sunburn Cure with a Secret Ingredient. Or buy it. Look for fresh aloe vera in the produce aisle, or buy gel at the pharmacy. If you go the fresh route, peel away the tough skin from the inner gel with a sharp knife. You can then pulverize the gel or just rub it on any offending bites. (A 4-ounce bottle of Aloe Vera Gel is \$3.46 from iHerb.com.)
Above: Often associated with relieving painful sunburns, aloe vera is also helpful for mosquito bites. Make your own at DIY: A Soothing Sunburn Cure with a Secret Ingredient. Or buy it. Look for fresh aloe vera in the produce aisle, or buy gel at the pharmacy. If you go the fresh route, peel away the tough skin from the inner gel with a sharp knife. You can then pulverize the gel or just rub it on any offending bites. (A 4-ounce bottle of Aloe Vera Gel is $3.46 from iHerb.com.)

Peppermint Poultice

Mash peppermint leaves into a paste and apply it to especially bothersome bites for a cooling sensation. If you&#8\2\17;re an adept forager, you can also make a soothing poultice from jewelweed, plantain, or chickweed. And if you don&#8\2\17;t happen to have a mortar and pestle handy, you can just chew the herbs to mash them–bonus points for using your very Gardenista wilderness survival skills.
Above: Mash peppermint leaves into a paste and apply it to especially bothersome bites for a cooling sensation. If you’re an adept forager, you can also make a soothing poultice from jewelweed, plantain, or chickweed. And if you don’t happen to have a mortar and pestle handy, you can just chew the herbs to mash them–bonus points for using your very Gardenista wilderness survival skills.

Don’t go, we’ve got more bugs and pests stories:

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