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Only You Can Stamp Out Forests

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Only You Can Stamp Out Forests

October 3, 2013

Designed in Oregon–where they really know their trees–a set of rubber tree stamps feels like having your own forest. Seriously, when isn’t it appropriate to festoon your stationery, utility bills, and tax returns with beautiful renderings of noble Douglas firs?

Made by Portland-based architect Brendon Farrell along with Javid Howell, these rubber stamp kits pay homage to native Northwest trees. (Can they be persuaded to branch out to the tropics–and palm tree–next?)

Above: A Northwest Rubber Stamp Set depicts Douglas firs; $78 from Canoe.

Above: The sets are made in limited quantities (other tree varieties are already sold out).

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