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Edible Gardens for Beginners: With Gardenuity, There’s No Guesswork

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Edible Gardens for Beginners: With Gardenuity, There’s No Guesswork

January 14, 2019

First-time gardeners need a little extra help. With an edible container-garden kit from Dallas-based Gardenuity,  they will get it. “You’ll automatically get weather alerts for your zip code from us,” says company co-founder Donna Letier.  “If there’s an expected spring heat wave after you plant your tomatoes, we’ll tell you to roll them into the shade for the next two days.”

In fact, Gardenuity won’t even let you plant those tomatoes—or that basil or kale, or anything else—if the weather isn’t right. “Not a match today,” the site will inform you. You can request a notification when the time is right, but you can’t purchase an edible plant out of season.

“New gardeners want somebody to feel like they’re on the path with them—and we’re right there,” said Letier.

A Complete Garden Kit to grow spinach (as shown in the top photo) comes with a reusable black grow-bag planter as well as seeds, soil, compost, and nutrients; $35.
Above: A Complete Garden Kit to grow spinach (as shown in the top photo) comes with a reusable black grow-bag planter as well as seeds, soil, compost, and nutrients; $35.

Gardenuity sells kits at prices from $28 to $49 to grow dozens of vegetables and herbs (kits are customized for indoor or outdoor placement). Some kits come with seeds and others with seedlings (depending on the easiest way to grow a particular plant).

A Cocktail Garden Kit With Herb Plants comes with four seedlings in 4-inch pots. Current selections include lemon thyme, rosemary, and two varieties of mint; $39.
Above: A Cocktail Garden Kit With Herb Plants comes with four seedlings in 4-inch pots. Current selections include lemon thyme, rosemary, and two varieties of mint; $39.

Along with the kits, Gardenuity offers advice to “personally guide you through your growing experience.” This includes personalized weather alerts, feeding reminders, recipes, and step-by-step instructions for harvest.

A Complete Carrots Garden Kit comes with seeds pre-spaced for planting in a biodegradable square; $35.
Above: A Complete Carrots Garden Kit comes with seeds pre-spaced for planting in a biodegradable square; $35.

“We try to make it easy—the whole container garden can be set up in an hour,” says Letier. “It’s like a piece of white paper towel. Just put the seed square on top of the bag and the seeds will germinate in nine or ten days.”

With accessories such as a MoGrow Coaster rolling teak planter stand, Gardenuity’s edible container gardens are mobile; $19.t
Above: With accessories such as a MoGrow Coaster rolling teak planter stand, Gardenuity’s edible container gardens are mobile; $19.t

See more growing tips in Edible Gardens: A Field Guide to Planting, Care & Design in our Garden Design 101 guides. Get more ideas for Your First Garden:

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