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Jasmine Jasminum

Growing Jasmine: Tips at a Glance

A jasmine vine on a trellis has an evening perfume that centuries ago lured Persian kings to stroll in the garden. It can thrive in yours with our tips.

  • Type Flowering vine
  • Lifespan Perennial
  • Growing Zones 5-10
  • Light Sun or some shade
  • Water Well-drained soil
  • Where to Plant Near a doorway
  • Design Tip Night fragrance
  • Companions Clematis
  • Peak Season Spring or summer flowers

Jasmine: A Field Guide

Centuries ago Persian kings planted jasmine vine for the evening perfume it released, luring them to take garden strolls in the cooling air.  

To capture that same perfume, plant a jasmine vine near a doorway or on an arbor or a trellis above a walkway. A family of vigorous growers, Jasminum has more than 200 species (some of which are shrubs). Vining varieties can grow as high as 40 feet. J. officinale (common jasmine) has small white, star-shaped flowers, followed in the season by small black berries. The fragrant vine star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides), grown widely in the southern US, is not a true jasmine; it belongs to a different genus altogether.

Planting, Care & Design of Jasmine

More About Jasmine

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