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Trending on Remodelista: New Meets Old

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Trending on Remodelista: New Meets Old

August 19, 2022

We love preserved historical homes. We also love modern new builds. Our favorite, though: design that marries old with new. Here, some examples from Remodelista this week.

A centuries-old stone house with a modern all-wood extension. Photograph by Jim Stephenson, from A Historic English Countryside Cottage Gets a Contemporary Extension.
Above: A centuries-old stone house with a modern all-wood extension. Photograph by Jim Stephenson, from A Historic English Countryside Cottage Gets a Contemporary Extension.
A sleek conservatory atop a \1950s barge converted into a houseboat. Photograph courtesy of The Modern House, from A River Runs Through It: A Family’s Barge-Turned-Houseboat on the Thames.
Above: A sleek conservatory atop a 1950s barge converted into a houseboat. Photograph courtesy of The Modern House, from A River Runs Through It: A Family’s Barge-Turned-Houseboat on the Thames.
Above: A new kitchen built using traditional Japanese woodcraft methods. Photograph by Robert Holmes, from Kitchen of the Week: A Japanophile’s Handcrafted Kitchen on the Sussex Coast.

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