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Tools of the Trade: Japanese Garden Snippers

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Tools of the Trade: Japanese Garden Snippers

January 18, 2016

Garden tool or work of art? Both, we think.

At Tajika Haruo Ironworks in northeast Japan, father and son Takeo and Daisuke Tajika carry on a family tradition (dating to 1928) by forging, shaping, and sharpening each pair of garden clippers by hand.

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Above: A hand-forged pair of iron Garden Clippers is $136.72 from Analogue Life. Tajika Garden Clippers also are available for $145 per pair from Nalata Nalata.

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Above: Father and son work side by side in their factory in Ono. Photograph via Natasalata.

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Above: A leather strap holds the handles together for secure storage.

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Above: Hand-sharpened blades are made of steel. “When I’m asked why we don’t mechanize our processes, I always explain how when manufacturing by hand it’s possible to finely tune the work in a way that a machine can’t do,” Daisuke Tajika recently told Nalata Nalata.

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