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The Easiest Urban Garden?

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The Easiest Urban Garden?

February 26, 2013

“Gutter” is not the most beautiful word in the English language (nor does it have the happiest connotations: read “guttersnipe”). But when it comes to gardening, it’s a different story; read on to discover how to transform a gutter into a vertical garden.

Urban pioneers like SF-based Tiffanie Turner, writer of the Corner Blog, maximize their outdoor space by creating micro gardens planted in—gutters. For a DIY, go to the Corner Blog.

Above: A crop of young lettuces and salad-bound nasturtiums.

Above: Turner used standard galvanized steel roof gutters; for how-to instructions, go to the Corner Blog.

Above: A colander full of greens from the gutter garden.

For more creative urban solutions, see Joost Bakker’s Vertical Gardens.

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