Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Ask the Expert: Photographer and ‘New York Green’ Author Ngoc Minh Ngo on her Favorite NYC Green Spaces

Search

Ask the Expert: Photographer and ‘New York Green’ Author Ngoc Minh Ngo on her Favorite NYC Green Spaces

May 17, 2023

Parks and gardens might not be the first things you think of when you envision New York City, but these green spaces are vital to its vibrancy and health. They cool down temperatures, help reduce carbon pollution, capture stormwater, create habitats for wildlife, and make us happy. Luckily for both residents and visitors alike, the city is full of them: from tourist destinations like iconic Central Park and a world class botanical garden to neighborhood rooftop farms and pocket community parks.

New York Green: Discovering the City’s Most Treasured Parks and Gardens by Ngoc Minh Ngo hits bookstores on May \23. Preorder your copy at your local independent bookseller or through bookshop.org.
Above: New York Green: Discovering the City’s Most Treasured Parks and Gardens by Ngoc Minh Ngo hits bookstores on May 23. Preorder your copy at your local independent bookseller or through bookshop.org.

Photographer and writer Ngoc Minh Ngo traveled throughout the city’s five boroughs to document some of these sustaining places for her new book New York Green. This heavily researched and beautifully photographed book is a must have for any garden lover or city dweller. Ngo delves into the rich history behind each of these gardens and captures the spirit of the place in her evocative photographs. As she writes in the book’s introduction: “They are places where New Yorkers gather, pause, play, chill, learn, and discover; offering not only Olmsted’s ‘enlarged sense of freedom’ but also an amplified sense of wonder and a deeper understanding of our place in the environment.” Below, she shares some of her favorites.

Prettiest Views

In spring the promontory lawn at Hunter&#8\2\17;s Point South Park in Queens is abloom with daffodils. “The dialogue between the urban and the pastoral is at the heart of the park’s evocative beauty,” writes Ngo. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: In spring the promontory lawn at Hunter’s Point South Park in Queens is abloom with daffodils. “The dialogue between the urban and the pastoral is at the heart of the park’s evocative beauty,” writes Ngo. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

“Well, there’s Wave Hill overlooking the Hudson River, Brooklyn Bridge Park at Sunset, and Roosevelt Island when the cherry trees are blooming, but a place that many might not have visited is Hunter’s Point South Park in Queens. It has an amazing view unlike anywhere else. It’s expansive. You can see almost the entire Manhattan skyline.

I have so much respect and admiration for the landscape architects and engineers who created this garden. It was all funded by public money, which is to say very little money. The design and the transformation of the site is amazing. The way they made these wet meadows, using them both aesthetically and ecologically, it’s a model for waterfront resiliency. It’s an amazing project that New Yorkers should be really proud of.”

Best for Birdwatching

“The most spectacular ecological feature of the park—a harmonious marriage of ecology and urban park design—is the Flower Field on the rambling Pier 6,” writes Ngo of Brooklyn Bridge Park. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: “The most spectacular ecological feature of the park—a harmonious marriage of ecology and urban park design—is the Flower Field on the rambling Pier 6,” writes Ngo of Brooklyn Bridge Park. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

“Central Park and Prospect Park are the usual places for birdwatching. But I’ve also seen many warblers in Brooklyn Bridge Park, which has been planted for a diverse ecology.” “Over 120 species of birds have been spotted in the park,” writes Ngo.

Most Peaceful

The Naval Cemetery Landscape is land that had many lives. It was once farmland, then a navy shipbuilding facility, and then a cemetery for the Brooklyn Naval Hospital before it was closed off for nearly a century. In \20\16 it reopened and is now a peaceful oasis. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: The Naval Cemetery Landscape is land that had many lives. It was once farmland, then a navy shipbuilding facility, and then a cemetery for the Brooklyn Naval Hospital before it was closed off for nearly a century. In 2016 it reopened and is now a peaceful oasis. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

“The Naval Cemetery Landscape in Brooklyn is such a poetic space for me. The design and thought that went into it and knowing what that place had once been invites contemplation,” Ngo says. As she writes in New York Green, “You slacken your pace. You hear the birds. You see the insects. You pay attention to the green life that’s all around you, learning the names of the park’s flora and fauna, perhaps for the first time. The world reveals itself in a whole new language. Spend some time in this place and it might change your way of thinking.”

Best for Spring Flowers

“There are so many places. The Met Cloisters is spectacular when all the tulips and bulbs are in bloom. The incredible setting transports you in time and geography. It’s fantastic.

I also love to visit the tulip trees in Green-Wood Cemetery when they are in bloom. I’ve never seen such a density of tulip trees, and these gigantic ones are beyond anything I’ve seen. It’s transporting to think of what was here before. There were giants in the forest before we cut everything down.”

Shady Summer Go-to

“The Battery prides itself as a ‘paradise of plants,’ with the largest perennial gardens in North America free and open to the public every day,” notes Ngo. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: “The Battery prides itself as a ‘paradise of plants,’ with the largest perennial gardens in North America free and open to the public every day,” notes Ngo. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

The Battery is one of my favorite places in summer. When the plantings are dense and knitted together, you see the genius of designer Piet Oudolf. It’s also the shadiest spot downtown in the summer. It is more a garden than a park, with Oudolf’s planting as the star.

Also, I love to visit the Liz Christy Community Garden, the city’s first official community garden, when the metasequoia tree is in full leaf. It was the first tree planted there, as a tiny seedling decades ago. It’s now huge. It’s lovely to see that embodiment of the garden’s history. It’s a beautiful metaphor: this tiny thing that has grown and has had such a huge impact.”

Favorite Fall Spot

“I love to go to Central Park to see the Chrysanthemums in the Conservatory Garden. I normally don’t like that almost eye-candy-like kind of gardening, but it’s done so well. The colors are eye-catching without being garish. The Korean chrysanthemums are so graceful. And it’s just a beautiful sentiment.”

Dreamiest Winter Wonderland

“As winter gives way to spring, the blooming heaths cut an undulating swath of pink and white through the heather beds,” writes Ngo of the Heather Garden at Fort Tryon Park. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: “As winter gives way to spring, the blooming heaths cut an undulating swath of pink and white through the heather beds,” writes Ngo of the Heather Garden at Fort Tryon Park. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

“I love Prospect Park after a snowstorm when the trees are beautifully crystalized. You feel like you’re in a winter wonderland.

Then the Heather Garden at Fort Tryon Park in late winter when the heath are in bloom. It’s unique; you can’t see that anywhere else in the city.

It’s also always a treat to visit the New York Botanical Garden to see all the colors in their annual Orchid Show.”

Best-Kept Secret Garden

“This portal to a world of poetry and another way of seeing is just a short ferry ride away,” writes Ngo of New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden in Staten Island. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © \20\23. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.
Above: “This portal to a world of poetry and another way of seeing is just a short ferry ride away,” writes Ngo of New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden in Staten Island. Excerpted from New York Green by Ngoc Minh Ngo (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2023. Photographs by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

The New York Chinese Scholars Garden on Staten Island is such a gem. You go there and suddenly you’re in China. You’re completely transported in both place and time.

I also love all of the community gardens I visited, like Gil Hodges Community Garden in Brooklyn. It’s a tiny place but I gave it six pages because I wanted to talk about how every little place can actually play a part in green infrastructure and water management. It’s amazing what they’ve done.”

See also:

(Visited 4,196 times, 1 visits today)
You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Frequently asked questions

Who is the photographer featured in the article?

The photographer featured in the article is Ngoc Minh Ngo.

What is Ngoc Minh Ngo's favorite subject to photograph in NYC?

Ngoc Minh Ngo's favorite subject to photograph in NYC is parks and gardens.

What is the website where the article is published?

The article is published on Gardenista's website.

What is the link to the article?

The link to the article is: https://www.gardenista.com/posts/photographer-new-york-green-author-ngoc-minh-ngo-favorite-nyc-parks-gardens/

What type of photography does Ngoc Minh Ngo specialize in?

Ngoc Minh Ngo specializes in lifestyle and gardening photography.

What can readers expect to find in the article?

Readers can expect to find Ngoc Minh Ngo's insights on NYC parks and gardens, along with her stunning photographs.

Where is Ngoc Minh Ngo based?

Ngoc Minh Ngo is based in New York.

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0