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The Neo-Homesteader’s Essential Garden Journal

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The Neo-Homesteader’s Essential Garden Journal

Michelle Slatalla October 02, 2013

Making use of scrap wood and scavenged reclaimed materials (including, when appropriate, leather from WWII gun holsters), Philadelphia-based designers Margaux and Walter Kent are neo-homesteaders who create the kind of products for their Peg and Awl line that they also would use themselves. We particularly like their frontier style garden journals, fashioned from hardwood covers, hand-torn sheets of drawing paper, and sturdy binder’s linen: 

Above: With hand sewn pages and a cover made from reclaimed wood, each Coptic Bound Reclaimed Journal is unique; $50 apiece from Peg and Awl.

Above: The journals come with a choice of either walnut or oak covers; each measures 4.75 inches high and has 78 sheets of paper.

Above: The designers say, “The wood will vary greatly from one book to another and may show signs of the wood’s prior life such as bug holes, nail holes, knots…though most of the wood that we use for book covers shows its beauty is in the grain itself.”

For more about Peg and Awl, see Frontier-Style Goods for the 21st Century.

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