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Plant Based Diet: Summer Goddess Sun Tea

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Plant Based Diet: Summer Goddess Sun Tea

June 15, 2018

Making sun tea is kind of like cheating. In the best way. It sounds fancy and tastes delicious, but requires less effort than you’d think. Our summer goddess sun tea recipe is from natural beauty expert Jessa Blades. It’s a bright, floral variation on the iced tea you’re probably already drinking. Sweetened with a brown sugar and chamomile syrup and packed with vitamin C-rich hibiscus and rose petals, this version is as tasty as it is nutritional. It’s also a showstopper.

Photography by Erin Boyle.

Dried hibiscus and rose petals make a ruby-colored sun tea.
Above: Dried hibiscus and rose petals make a ruby-colored sun tea.
Jessa blends equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers to make summer goddess tea.
Above: Jessa blends equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers to make summer goddess tea.
Leave the tea in a sunny window or a fire escape for an hour or two to steep.
Above: Leave the tea in a sunny window or a fire escape for an hour or two to steep.
Dried chamomile flowers are used for making a floral-scented simple syrup that sweetens the tea.
Above: Dried chamomile flowers are used for making a floral-scented simple syrup that sweetens the tea.
Organic brown sugar is a healthier alternative to refined white sugar, which is typically used in simple syrups.
Above: Organic brown sugar is a healthier alternative to refined white sugar, which is typically used in simple syrups.
Chamomile flowers steep in the simple syrup.
Above: Chamomile flowers steep in the simple syrup.
Strain syrup into a clean container and keep refrigerated.
Above: Strain syrup into a clean container and keep refrigerated.

Summer Goddess Sun Tea

  • Equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers, blended
  • 1 to 3 teaspoons of flowers per 8 ounces of water

Brew sun tea by leaving a jar of water and flower petals in a sunny window for an hour or two. The hibiscus imparts its flavor quickly, so the tea doesn’t take long to brew. A caveat: there’s some risk of bacteria growth when making sun tea. If you think you’ll leave your tea out for more than a couple of hours, consider brewing it overnight in the refrigerator instead, or making it the old-fashioned way with boiling water. If you use boiling water, pour it over dried flowers, cover, and let sit for 10 minutes before straining.

Brown Sugar Chamomile Syrup

  • 1 cup organic brown sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup dried chamomile flowers

In a medium saucepan combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat and add chamomile flowers and cover with a lid. Jessa likes to add one cup of flowers for a strong chamomile flavor. If you prefer a subtler flavor, add just a half cup of flowers. Allow to cool and then strain into a clean container and enjoy. Syrup can be refrigerated for up to one month.

Are you looking for more healthy recipes for summer? Browse our Plant Based Diet archives and read more:

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