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Framed and Foraged: DIY Wall Hangings

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Framed and Foraged: DIY Wall Hangings

Alexa Hotz January 03, 2013

If you’re walking the beaches of coastal Oregon town Lincoln City, you might spot Kinfolk’s founding editor Nathan Williams foraging for sea coral, tree bark, and the perfect pieces of twisted driftwood.

Williams forms each find in simple metal frames, wreaths, and sculptures on the weekend; see more from Williams on his blog Hear Black.

Above: Pale green and white sea coral reminiscent of Olafur Eliasson’s Moss Wall. The frame is filled with a mix of coral and dried sea urchins then left in the sun to dry out completely before bringing it indoors.

Above: Driftwood sculptures are, as Williams explains, “easier for us to make when the individual pieces have similar bends and curves. When we walk on the beach we carry a tote bag and gather driftwood with this in mind.”

Above: Detail of the circular driftwood wreath.

Above: “To assemble the heart, we start by gluing together the outline, then filling the inside with other pieces.”

Above: “While we were living in Hawaii we would often find fallen trees on the beach with loose bark. We collected the pieces of bark, then used a hand saw for a clean edge. The bark was hot-glued to the back of a frame.”

N.B.: Looking for more gardening projects and natural decor? See 113 of our DIY posts.

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