Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

DIY: A Glamorous New Year’s Eve Ceiling

Search

DIY: A Glamorous New Year’s Eve Ceiling

December 30, 2013

When we spotted these balls dropping from Cecilia Fox’s ceiling, the symbolism didn’t escape us. Hang a few overhead at a New Year’s Eve party and no one will notice when you don’t turn on the TV to watch the countdown from Times Square.

Alexa (who used to work for a florist) told us how to recreate these balls of gypsophila paniculata, commonly known as baby’s breath: “They’re easy and they will last a long time, because after they dry out, they will look exactly the same.”

Want to try? For Alexa’s step by step instructions and a materials list, see below.

Working on a menu for New Year’s Eve? See our 5-Ingredient Holiday Cocktail Party.

Above: Photograph courtesy of Cecilia Fox.

Use a small florist’s foam ball (see below for Materials) as a base. Cut a length of wire about 8 inches longer than the ball’s diameter; thread the wire through the middle of the wall, making a loop at the bottom to secure it. Then cut a length of twine (make it a few inches longer than you think you’ll need to suspend it at the height you want; you can trim it to the exact length when you hang it). Knot the end of the twine and run the wire through the knot to secure the twine to the ball. Trim excess wire.

Next, soak the ball in water for five minutes.

Above: Photograph courtesy of Cecilia Fox.

After the ball is thoroughly wet, stick the ends of the baby’s breath branches into the foam at a perpendicular angle. Cover the ball loosely with a first layer of branches and then fill in empty spaces with the rest of the branches; trim some shorter to fill in the gaps.

Materials:

Planning a New Year’s party? See our 7 Best Holiday Cocktails.

N.B.: This is an update of a post published December 21, 2012 during our Winter Cabins week.

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0