Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Design Sleuth: Corrugated Zinc Planter

Search

Design Sleuth: Corrugated Zinc Planter

Michelle Slatalla April 15, 2013

My zinc planter is the perfect size and color to host my favorite purple-tinged succulents in a tabletop container garden. I don’t remember where I got it, but the other day I spotted an identical zinc planter at Anthropologie. In three sizes. Temptation, thy name is corrugated metal:

Above: My round zinc planter is 7.5 inches in diameter and 4 inches high; the right size container garden for nearly any table or counter, indoors or out. An identical Small Ridged Zinc Pot is $14 from Anthropologie. Photograph by Michelle Slatalla

Above: In addition to the Small Ridged Zinc Pot (L) I used to make a tabletop succulent garden, Anthropologie sells two taller versions suitable for a single plant with deeper roots; the taller Ridged Zinc Pots are $12 and $20 apiece, depending on height.

Looking for more creative ways to group succulents? See DIY: Succulent Table Garden.

Above: There’s no drainage hole in my zinc planter, so I put a layer of gravel in the bottom beneath the potting soil. Photograph by Michelle Slatalla.

Looking for a tabletop container suitable to plant a collection of succulents? See World’s Best Tabletop Garden.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our Partners