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‘Decorating With Plants’: 6 Ideas to Steal from a New Book by Baylor Chapman

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‘Decorating With Plants’: 6 Ideas to Steal from a New Book by Baylor Chapman

June 13, 2019

Houseplants—like wide-brimmed hats and macrame wall hangings—are back in style. So far in 2019 alone, more than a dozen new books about potted plants have been published. (And we’re only halfway through the year.) One title, Decorating With Plants, by Baylor Chapman, stands out.

Its subtitle is “What to Choose, Ways to Style, and How to Make Them Thrive”—and that pretty much sums up this useful and inspiring book. In the book, Chapman—founder of Lila B. Design, a green-certified floral studio in San Francisco—teaches readers the basics of caring for houseplants; recommends 28 of her fuss-free favorites (from air plants to ZZ plants); and shares tips on how to incorporate them into your decor.

Here, five ways to decorate with plants, according to Chapman.

Excerpted from Decorating with Plants by Baylor Chapman (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2019. Photographs by Aubrie Pick.

In the Entry

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Above: “The system shown [here], created with a combination of wall-mounted pieces found at Pottery Barn, has a cohesive overall look thanks to a unifying color palette of blues, browns, and pinks that runs through the plants, vases, and accessories,” writes Chapman.

In the Kitchen

Above: “If space is tight, or you just want to add a bit of interest to your walls, here are two ways to elevate your potted plants. They will be heavy, especially after they’ve been watered, so make sure that whatever hanging style you select, you drill into a stud or use a wall anchor,” she suggests.

In the Living Room

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Above: “If your living room has a bookshelf, turn it into an open display case that communicates who you are and what is most meaningful to you. Alongside your books, heirlooms, baseball trophies, and family photos, sprinkle in some plants that give you as much joy as these mementos,” writes Chapman.

In the Dining Room

An easy way to create an arresting centerpiece? &#8
Above: An easy way to create an arresting centerpiece? “Head out to your local garden center and pick up various grasses, roses, and succulents (echeverias and frost-tolerant houseleeks are pictured here) and place them in terracotta pots for an indoor-outdoor living centerpiece.”

In the Bedroom

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Above: “For a clean and calm look, you can’t beat a simple white-and-green palette,” she writes of this tranquil bedroom that features a meandering ‘Jade’ pothos plant.

In the Bathroom

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Above: “This arrangement is a lesson in the importance of layering for scale and interest. If all these plants were at the same height as the tub, it would make for a one-note display, and the tub would overpower the space. Instead each plant is on its own level.”

For more on houseplants, see:

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