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Berkshire Artisanal Show at Ochre

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Berkshire Artisanal Show at Ochre

November 13, 2013

We often talk about the value of bringing a little bit of green inside. In fact, this week we admit that we’ve gone houseplant crazy. But a recent botanical print collection from artist Caroline Kaars Sypesteyn has us agreeing that a houseplant isn’t the only way to bring a little bit of the natural world inside. If you find yourself balking at the idea of keeping anything green alive, perhaps we can enchant you with a botanical print instead.

A painter, Caroline has been working with gouache stains on plaster-coated linen for several years now. In her collection Berkshire Artisanal, which will be exhibited at Ochre on Broome Street in Manhattan next week, Caroline merges photographic images onto the same coated fabric through archival inkjet printing
 
Since moving to the Berkshires several years ago, Caroline has been photographing the botanicals and small farms she finds in the Hudson Valley and Berkshire hills near her home. In her words: “There are farms that feature exquisite animals and botanicals. And landscapes that become all the more beautiful under gray skies in cold seasons. These are the subjects that respond to the stains and textures of my surfaces.” 

Above: A hydrangea in winter.

Above: Hydrangea in black and white.

To see the works in person, join Caroline at Ochre on Broome Street in Manhattan on Tuesday, November 19 from 6 pm to 8 pm. RSVP to [email protected]

Drawn to muted shades? See Brown Is a Color.

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