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Architect Visit: Garden Building Roundup

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Architect Visit: Garden Building Roundup

July 8, 2010

For avid gardeners, the ultimate luxury is a designated garden shed for corralling tools and accessories; preferably with a utility sink for tidying up. Here’s a roundup of a few outbuildings spotted in the portfolios of architects we admire.

Wirth Architekten

A remisenpavillion—a multi-use garage in the farmlands of Lower Saxony—is such a standout. Designed by Bremen-based Wirth Architekten for a country house estate, the small brick, wood, and concrete building serves utilitarian needs like car and tractor storage, as well as whimsical ones like as a loggia for summertime outdoor parties. Photograph by Christian Burmeister, courtesy of Wirth Architekten.
Above: A remisenpavillion—a multi-use garage in the farmlands of Lower Saxony—is such a standout. Designed by Bremen-based Wirth Architekten for a country house estate, the small brick, wood, and concrete building serves utilitarian needs like car and tractor storage, as well as whimsical ones like as a loggia for summertime outdoor parties. Photograph by Christian Burmeister, courtesy of Wirth Architekten.

StudioErrante Architetture

Behind a house in a village in northwestern Italy, designers Sarah Becchio and Paolo Borghino of StudioErrante Architetture discovered a tiny, ramshackle shed with a useful purpose and a long history.Formerly used to store firewood, the shed had ventilated walls, which made wood dry faster.  StudioErrante came up with a plan to rebuild the shed and add some features to it that would be useful not only to the owners, but also to neighbors whose property abutted the courtyard.
Above: Behind a house in a village in northwestern Italy, designers Sarah Becchio and Paolo Borghino of StudioErrante Architetture discovered a tiny, ramshackle shed with a useful purpose and a long history.
Formerly used to store firewood, the shed had ventilated walls, which made wood dry faster.  StudioErrante came up with a plan to rebuild the shed and add some features to it that would be useful not only to the owners, but also to neighbors whose property abutted the courtyard.

Helen Lucas

The shed opens onto a patio and deck.
Above: The shed opens onto a patio and deck.

Above: For this “posh potting shed,” Edinburgh architect Helen Lucas used a simple palette of materials: cedar boarding (for the external cladding), aluminum (roof and roof structure), and glass (double-glazed timber-framed windows and doors). See more in Architect Visit: A “Posh” Potting Shed by Helen Lucas.

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