Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
Search

Pear Tree Pyrus

Growing Pear Trees: Tips at a Glance

  • Type Fruit tree
  • Oldest on Record 350+ years
  • USDA Zones 2-8
  • Light Full sun
  • Crown Round or weeping
  • Location Pollinate with a pair
  • Design Tip Easy to espalier
  • Other Uses Ornamental
  • Peak Season Flowers in spring

Pear Trees: A Field Guide

Introduced to North America in the 16th century, the common pear tree can live for centuries (and produce more than a hundred bushel baskets of fruit per year).

Pear trees come by their gnarled branches honestly. They date to prehistoric times, with dozens of species (some ornamental and others bearing edible fruit) hailing from Asia, Europe, and beyond. (The ancient Romans ate pears both raw and cooked in honey, a precursor to our own favorite Oven-Canned Cardamom Pears.)

(Visited 309 times, 1 visits today)

Planting, Care & Design of Pear Trees

More About Pear Trees

v5.0