Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

The Once and Future Boathouse

Search

The Once and Future Boathouse

July 31, 2012

Spotted on Designboom, a summer boathouse in Norway that is at once rustic and futuristic (indeed, it looks like it was rendered by a particularly ingenious video-game designer for a Myst-like fantasy world).

No fantasy this: the boathouse is the work of Norwegian architecture firm Tyin Tegnestue, located in the township of Aure on the Norwegian coast. The architects dismantled an existing 1800s boathouse and created a new building that retains the simple form of the original with a wall of gull-wing-style panels to open the space to the breeze. We like this direction that architecture is taking: classic forms, reclaimed materials, and modern functionality.

Photography courtesy of Tyin Tegnestue Architects.

Above: The building is striped with light, thanks to floor-to-roof-peak windows. (N.B.: Want to see more of our favorite photos? See what we’re pinning and then follow us on Pinterest here.)

Above: The side facing the deck is composed of individual panels, lined with cotton canvas, which swing up to form an awning. (N.B.: For more, see “5 Favorites: Summer Boathouse Roundup.”)

Above: Above: Salvaged paneling lines the interior of the new, steel-framed structure; the windows were reclaimed from an old farmhouse.

Above: Above: A hanging fire pit provides extra warmth on chilly days.

Above: The building sits lightly on the original bedrock.

Above: Steel fittings anchor the paneled windows.

Above: Norwegian pine cladding will weather to a gray patina. For the world’s best lakeside cabins, see On Blue Mountain Lake: The Hedges.

(N.B.: This is an update of a post originally published on Nov. 11, 2011.)

For inspiration, see images of 11 more Boathouses in our Gallery of rooms and spaces.

You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0