Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
Search

Kudzu Pueraria

Killling Kudzu: Tips at a Glance

  • Type Invasive vine
  • Life Span Perennial
  • USDA Zones 5-11
  • Sun Shade to bright sun
  • Water Drought tolerant
  • Where to Plant Don't
  • Design Tip Goats eat it
  • Companions Smothers others
  • Location In southern US, heading north

Kudzu: A Field Guide

Kudzu is a killer. It’s smothering trees, shrubs, and landscapes at an alarming rate and has already blanketed more than 7 million acres in North America. It’s tireless.

Brought to the United States from Japan for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, kudzu was later used in the ’30s and ’40s for soil erosion efforts in the Southeast. Though its toughness has made it a good choice for basketry, paper, and textile production (its texture is like hemp), kudzu’s resilience is also what causes the problem. The fight goes on to smother, burn, and graze away this invasive vine. Needless to say, kudzu should be nowhere near your landscape.

More About Kudzu on Gardenista

v5.0