ISSUE 75  |  Travels with an Editor: Paris

Curb Appeal: Parisian Gilded House Numbers by See.Painting

June 05, 2013 7:00 PM

BY Francesca Connolly

Glass gilding, or verre églomisé, was the most popular form of signage in the 19th and early 20th centuries; we can see why.

Elegant and surprisingly durable, gilding continues to be a top choice, particularly for buildings of that period. New York-based decorative painter Sandra Spannan of See.Painting specializes in gilded surfaces; a painstaking process of applying tissue-thin sheets of metal and then carefully sealing them with varnish.

House numbers are custom designed and available in silver, copper, white gold, 23-karat yellow gold, and palladium leaf. Go to See.Painting for pricing and more information.

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Above: Palladium leaf on a brownstone in Brooklyn.

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Above: The Ace Hotel entrance sign in New York City.

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Above three photos: Gilded signage with green shadow on a Harlem brownstone.

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Above: The See studio created signage for Centrico in Tribeca using 23-karat gold leaf on glass with a polished gelatine finish.

For more house numbers, see 5 Favorites: British Front Doors With Style.