ISSUE 21  |  On the Lawn

New Terrain to Cover (in Connecticut)

May 21, 2012 9:30 PM

BY Michelle Slatalla

Our friend Katharine Huber, an architect and photographer, stopped by Terrain’s cavernous new garden and home store in Westport, Connecticut the other day: “It was like a party in there,” she reports.

Westport is the sort of leafy, green town where everybody gardens (“all my friends raise vegetables,” Huber says). At the Post Road store, Huber found Terrain had converted a 17,000-square-foot former Cadillac dealership into a space that displays a mix-and-match collection of indoor and outdoor products: vertical gardens, hand-carved acacia salad bowls, and little glass orbs that hold plants. “I ran into one friend I know from taking the train together to New York, and she started showing me all the terrariums,” says Huber. “And then I met the manager, who was really friendly, and I ended up buying a gift. You’re going to laugh, because what I bought was this white and red bakery string that my friend has been looking for.” Here are some other things she saw:

Photography by Katharine Huber, except where noted.

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Above: From the parking lot, you enter a garden area first, and then head inside. “It’s sort of a progression that’s really not at all retail-like,” Huber says. “It’s very pleasant.”

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Above: Overhead, a forest of Glass Hanging Orbs ($28 apiece). Image via Terrain.

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Above: To the left of the front door, a wall garden and perennials for sale: veronica, grasses, herbs, and lambs’ ear.

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Above: “In the back of the store, I discovered another door, and I was like, oh, well, look, patio furniture,” Huber says. “I kind of stumbled on it because I wanted to take photos of the exterior.”

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Above: Each Acacia Wood Individual Salad Bowl is hand carved; they’re $10 apiece.

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Above: The store’s cafe menu emphasizes local, seasonal ingredients.

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Above: The Boulder Mug has multiple layers of ceramic glazing; $10 per mug.

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Above: Across from the coffee bar is where Huber happened upon a display of bakery twine. “What’s unusual is that everything for sale is sort of inter-mixed with everything else,” Huber says.

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Above: A reusable Tin Twine Dispenser is $15. Image via Terrain.

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Above: A pot of Flowering Oregano, in a weathered wood planter, is $68. Image via Terrain.